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Normative Principles General Normative Principles
 
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Subject: Library and Information Science Course Name: Organization of Knowledge: Library Classification Keyword: Swayamprabha
Normative principles of cataloguing: laws, canons and principle Part-I-LIS
 
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Subject: Library and Information Science Paper: Knowledge Organization Structure – Cataloguing Content writer: Dr. S.P. Sood P3 M03
Views: 3941 Vidya-mitra
What is NORMATIVE ETHICS? What does NORMATIVE ETHICS mean? NORMATIVE ETHICS meaning & explanation
 
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What is NORMATIVE ETHICS? What does NORMATIVE ETHICS mean? NORMATIVE ETHICS meaning - NORMATIVE ETHICS definition - NORMATIVE ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Normative ethics is the study of ethical action. It is the branch of philosophical ethics that investigates the set of questions that arise when considering how one ought to act, morally speaking. Normative ethics is distinct from meta-ethics because it examines standards for the rightness and wrongness of actions, while meta-ethics studies the meaning of moral language and the metaphysics of moral facts. Normative ethics is also distinct from descriptive ethics, as the latter is an empirical investigation of people’s moral beliefs. To put it another way, descriptive ethics would be concerned with determining what proportion of people believe that killing is always wrong, while normative ethics is concerned with whether it is correct to hold such a belief. Hence, normative ethics is sometimes called prescriptive, rather than descriptive. However, on certain versions of the meta-ethical view called moral realism, moral facts are both descriptive and prescriptive at the same time. Most traditional moral theories rest on principles that determine whether an action is right or wrong. Classical theories in this vein include utilitarianism, Kantianism, and some forms of contractarianism. These theories mainly offered the use of overarching moral principles to resolve difficult moral decisions. There are disagreements about what precisely gives an action, rule, or disposition its ethical force. There are three competing views on how moral questions should be answered, along with hybrid positions that combine some elements of each. Virtue ethics focuses on the character of those who are acting, while both deontological ethics and consequentialism focus on the status of the action, rule, or disposition itself. The latter two conceptions of ethics themselves come in various forms. Virtue ethics, advocated by Aristotle with some aspects being supported by St Thomas Aquinas, focuses on the inherent character of a person rather than on specific actions. There has been a significant revival of virtue ethics in the past half-century, through the work of such philosophers as G. E. M. Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Alasdair Macintyre, Mortimer J. Adler, Jacques Maritain, Yves Simon, and Rosalind Hursthouse. Deontology argues that decisions should be made considering the factors of one's duties and one's rights. Some deontological theories include: Immanuel Kant's Categorical Imperative, which roots morality in humanity's rational capacity and asserts certain inviolable moral laws. The contractualism of John Rawls, which holds that the moral acts are those that we would all agree to if we were unbiased. Natural rights theories, such that of John Locke or Robert Nozick, which hold that human beings have absolute, natural rights. Consequentialism (Teleology) argues that the morality of an action is contingent on the action's outcome or result. Consequentialist theories, differing in what they consider valuable (Axiology), include: Utilitarianism, which holds that an action is right if it leads to the most happiness for the greatest number of people. (Historical Note: Prior to the coining of the term "consequentialism" by Anscombe in 1958 and the adoption of that term in the literature that followed, "utilitarianism" was the generic term for consequentialism, referring to all theories that promoted maximizing any form of utility, not just those that promoted maximizing happiness.) State consequentialism or Mohist consequentialism, which holds that an action is right if it leads to state welfare, through order, material wealth, and population growth Egoism, the belief that the moral person is the self-interested person, holds that an action is right if it maximizes good for the self. Situation Ethics, which holds that the correct action is the one that creates the most loving result, and that love should always be our goal. Intellectualism, which dictates that the best action is the one that best fosters and promotes knowledge.....
Views: 4158 The Audiopedia
Regulative and Normative Principles - Paul Washer
 
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Small excerpt from the "Principles of Biblical Manhood" series by Paul Washer: https://youtu.be/1U-JmgBnFHk
Views: 523 MrHarms
Normative principles: laws, canons and principles Part-II - LIS
 
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Subject: Library and Information Science Paper: Knowledge Organization Structure – Cataloguing Content writer: Dr. S.P. Sood P3 M04
Views: 1413 Vidya-mitra
Orderly Worship: Regulative or Normative?  (What makes a good Church 6of10)
 
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Is there really a right or wrong way to worship God? This is a question that has divided the body of Christ as well as lead to splits within local churches. Hymns or Contemporary? A capella or instruments? Most would dismiss such questions as being secondary, irrelevant issues – and rightfully so. Simply put, the question is “To what extent do we seek to apply and live out the Scripture?” This debate has usually caused believers to adopt one of two opinions: Normative – Corporate church worship services must include all the elements that Scripture commands and may include others so long as they are not prohibited by Scripture. Regulative - Corporate church worship services must include all the elements that Scripture commands or are a good and necessary implication of a biblical text and nothing more, nothing less. -- Hand Balance Redux by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100370 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 9705 BenValentine83
Learning 5 Normative Ethical Theories in an Easy Way!
 
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Video Mini-Lesson #2-Learning 5 more normative ethical theories.
Views: 12187 Dr. William Barry
Normative Theories of Democracy
 
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This video lecture discusses three normative theories of democracy -- direct democracy, liberal democracy, and deliberative democracy -- that can inform our understanding of contemporary US government and politics, as well as the roles and functions of political communication in our system. The content is derived in part from Richard Perloff's (2014) The Dynamics of Political Communication, chapter 1.
Views: 3357 Stephen Klien
Utilitarianism: Crash Course Philosophy #36
 
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Our next stop in our tour of the ethical lay of the land is utilitarianism. With a little help from Batman, Hank explains the principle of utility, and the difference between act and rule utilitarianism. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1541544 CrashCourse
★Positive and Normative [QuickEcon]★
 
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It's important to distinguish between Positive and Normative Economics. Both play a role in policies.
Views: 73088 TheEconVids
Principles of Classification
 
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http://ala.org/alcts An ALCTS webinar. Have you ever wondered why we have library classification systems and how they work? How does one system organize information compared to another? This webinar covers basic, general principles of classification, presents the basic structure of the two main systems we use, Library of Congress Classification (LCC) and Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), and discusses their strengths and weaknesses. It illustrates some of the main differences between LCC and DDC with practical examples. Presented on November 12, 2012 by Lai Ma.
Views: 16130 alctsce
05   Defining principles
 
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What is a 'principle?' Two main types; scientific principle, normative principle.
NORMATIVE ETHICS: Introduction to Normative Ethics
 
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This video is the first in a series of philosophy videos on normative ethics. The normative level of moral inquiry seeks to ground our moral motivation, reasoning, and justification in the context of principles of for guiding our actions. We will start with principles which are taken to be necessary for successful moral theorizing, including the (1)the source of morality in our reasoning faculties, (2) the universal perspective for moral judgments, and (3)the impartiality of moral judgments. While not all ethical theories accept these above as normative requirements, it is noteworthy that most of the normative moral theories which are still with us today (which have stood the test of time) have been those which attach great weight to following the above normative requirements. In both the history of ethics as well as in our political and market institutions, the dominant two reason-based normative ethical approaches which have had the most widespread attention have been deontological Kantianism and utilitarian consequentialism. One need not be either a Kantian or a utilitarian in order to observe the pull which they have had on philosophers and laypeople alike. Any ethical theory which takes the three normative requirements seriously and gives a prominent place in an account of morality will be an ethical theory worth paying attention to because it captures powerful and long-standing intuitions we have for those three normative requirements. We need to see models of more or less time-tested ethical theories even in order to construct our own (if we want our ethical systems to actually have the normative force we take them to have.) We will explore so many other approaches to normative ethics in the coming videos! PLEASE 'Like' my video and subscribe to my channel if you enjoy the content and would like to see more in the future. Also, follow me at https://plus.google.com/112672764157522288066/about For those who wish to investigate this very rich topic in moral theory, a great place to start is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy! It is a vast resource which will give a far more complete and adequate treatment than I could ever hope to provide here. For a thorough account of moral reasoning http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/reasoning-moral/ For Kantian deontology http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-deontological/ For consequentialist utilitarianism http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/consequentialism/ For a detailed introduction to the normative moral theory, see Lewis Vaugh's Beginning Ethics: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy. 1st Edition, (Norton Books, 2015.)
PHILOSOPHY - Ethics: Utilitarianism, Part 1 [HD]
 
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In this Wireless Philosophy video, Julia Markovits (Cornell University) gives an introduction to the moral theory of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism is the view that the right moral action is the one that maximizes happiness for all. This is the first video in a three part series. Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGDk23Q0S9E Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoCuVa9UeR4 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/Fjql/
Views: 454573 Wireless Philosophy
What Is NORMATIVE ETHICS? NORMATIVE ETHICS Definition & Meaning
 
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What is NORMATIVE ETHICS, What does NORMATIVE ETHICS mean, NORMATIVE ETHICS meaning, NORMATIVE ETHICS definition, NORMATIVE ETHICS explanation Normative ethics is the study of ethical action. It is the branch of philosophical ethics that investigates the set of questions that arise when considering how one ought to act, morally speaking. Normative ethics is distinct from meta-ethics because it examines standards for the rightness and wrongness of actions, while meta-ethics studies the meaning of moral language and the metaphysics of moral facts; and it is distinct from applied ethics in that the former is more concerned with 'who ought one be' rather than the ethics of a specific issue (such as if, or when, abortion is acceptable). Normative ethics is also distinct from descriptive ethics, as the latter is an empirical investigation of people’s moral beliefs. In this context normative ethics is sometimes called prescriptive, rather than descriptive ethics. However, on certain versions of the meta-ethical view called moral realism, moral facts are both descriptive and prescriptive at the same time.[1] Most traditional moral theories rest on principles that determine whether an action is right or wrong. Classical theories in this vein include utilitarianism, Kantianism, and some forms of contractarianism. These theories mainly offered the use of overarching moral principles to resolve difficult moral decisions. Source: Wikipedia.org
Views: 5 Audiopedia
Normative Princeples canons for work in the Idea Plane part 1
 
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Subject: Library and Information Science Course Name: Organization of Knowledge: Library Classification Keyword: Swayamprabha
Kant & Categorical Imperatives: Crash Course Philosophy #35
 
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Our next stop on our tour of ethics is Kant’s ethics. Today Hank explains hypothetical and categorical imperatives, the universalizability principle, autonomy, and what it means to treat people as ends-in-themselves, rather than as mere means. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- All other images and video either public domain or via VideoBlocks, or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons BY 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1085978 CrashCourse
Metaethics: Crash Course Philosophy #32
 
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We begin our unit on ethics with a look at metaethics. Hank explains three forms of moral realism – moral absolutism, and cultural relativism, including the difference between descriptive and normative cultural relativism – and moral subjectivism, which is a form of moral antirealism. Finally, we’ll introduce the concept of an ethical theory. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 733211 CrashCourse
Principles of moral reasoning :: Deontology, Teleology and Ontology
 
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In this video, you will be able to: - Understand meaning of moral reasoning - Meaning of De ontological reasoning, Teleological reasoning and Ontological reasoning.. Click at subscribe for more awesome videos Visit http://mystcuniversity.com for more awesome stuffs...
Views: 8310 STC University
What is the Doctrine of Double Effect? (Philosophical Definition)
 
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A brief explanation of the four criteria of the famous Catholic Doctrine of Double Effect (originally created by St. Thomas Aquinas) and how it can be applied to the trolley problem and the fat man trolley problem. It also discusses some problems for this doctrine including those put forward by the loop trolley problem. Sponsors: João Costa Neto, Dakota Jones, Joe Felix, Prince Otchere, Mike Samuel, Daniel Helland, Dennis Sexton, Yu Saburi, Mauricino Andrade, Will Roberts and √2. Thanks for your support! Donate on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Carneades Buy stuff with Zazzle: http://www.zazzle.com/carneades Follow us on Twitter: @CarneadesCyrene https://twitter.com/CarneadesCyrene Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more! Information for this video gathered from The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy and more!
Views: 9643 Carneades.org
Descriptive vs. Normative
 
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Views: 23219 John Paulett
Utilitarianism
 
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Utilitarianism considers a decision or action as ethically correct, if the greatest benefits are received by the greatest number of people. Before we look at utilitarianism in more detail, let’s look at the entire concept map of all normative theories so we know exactly where ‘utilitarianism’ fits in. There are two broad categories of normative theories, namely: teleological and deontological theories. Utilitarianism is subset of teleological theory. So, we know that utilitarianism is a normative theory which means it is theory that focuses on how people SHOULD or OUGHT to behave. We also know that it is a branch of teleological theory. This means that it focuses on consequences and the outcomes of a decision rather than on intention. Under utilitarianism, a decision or action would be considered ‘ethically correct’ if it results in the greatest good to the greatest number of people. The converse is also true. That is, if a disadvantage cannot be avoided, then the decision or action that would result in the smallest number of people suffering would be ‘ethically correct’. Utilitarianism becomes more complicated when the action or decision that results in the greatest benefit to the greatest number of people also results in a cost or disadvantage to others. Therefore, it becomes imperative to use a systematic approach to resolving a problem using this theory. There are five steps when applying the utilitarian approach. These include the identification of the issue or problem, possible solutions or actions as well as all the costs and benefits associated with each possible action. The costs and benefits should then be weighed up against each other and the option that results in the greatest good to the greatest number of people should be selected. To recap, utilitarianism is a teleological theory. According to utilitarianism, a decision or action that results in the greatest benefit to the greatest number of people would be considered ethical.
Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34
 
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Our exploration of ethical theories continues with another theistic answer to the grounding problem: natural law theory. Thomas Aquinas’s version of this theory says that we all seek out what’s known as the basic goods and argued that instinct and reason come together to point us to the natural law. There are, of course, objections to this theory – in particular, the is-ought problem advanced by David Hume. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 679952 CrashCourse
Regulative Normative Principle in Churches. Which does your church use?
 
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The regulative-normative principle simplified - regulative says we can only do those things that God specifically mandates, encourages, and allows in the Bible. The normative principal says one can do anything that God does not condemn or speak on. In America we are mostly normative and at that it would be hard probably to find a purely regulative church given the age of subjectivism in which we live. Tell me below about your church or what you believe is right!!
Kant's Moral Theory (Part 1 of 2)
 
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I focus on the central themes needed to understand Kant's moral theory. One Correction: It was Bentham, not Mill, who stated rights are nonsense on stilts.
Views: 91092 teachphilosophy
Normative Principles of Medical Ethics by Sheikh Dr Shomali, 17th Sep 2017
 
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The first seminar on medical ethics was on 'Normative Principles of Medical Ethics' and was conducted on 17th September 2017. The programme included: 2:00-2:30 pm - introduction by Prof Shabih Haider Zaidi 2:30-3:00 pm - Islamic Perspective by Sheikh Muhammad Ali Shomali. 3:00-3:30 pm - Q&A related to topic only.
Views: 160 Islamic Lectures
Normative grammar Meaning
 
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Video shows what normative grammar means. A standard system of rules and principles for speaking and writing a language.. Normative grammar Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say normative grammar. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 145 ADictionary
Rights theory
 
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With rights theory, an action or decision would be considered ethically correct if it respects the rights of other people. Before we look at Rights theory in more detail, let’s look at the entire concept map of all normative theories so we know exactly where ‘rights theory’ fits in. There are two broad categories of normative theories, namely: teleological and deontological theories. Rights theory is a subset of deontological theory. So, we know that right theory is a normative theory which means it is theory that focuses on how people SHOULD or OUGHT to behave. We also know that it is a branch of deontological theory. This means that it focuses on the intention behind an act or decision rather than on the final outcome or resulting consequences. In terms of rights theory, if an action or decision respects the rights of other people it would be considered ethically correct. So respect is the key word in explaining rights theory’. That is, considering and upholding the rights of others is the foundation of the rights theory. Another important element of the rights theory are ‘rights’. There are many different types of rights. The major rights that people have are legal rights, human rights and contractual rights. The right to vote is a legal right because it arises from law and is legally enforceable. Freedom of speech is an example of a basic human right that all people should be entitled to because they are human beings. Contractual rights arise from an agreement or relationship. For example, a contract between a builder and a property investor. The builder has the right under the contract to receive a certain remuneration for his services and the property investor has the right under the contract to receive a developed property. It is important not to confuse rights with duties. A right is something you have as a human being or something you are entitled to. A duty is something you are obligated to do. The one major limitation of the rights theory is that there is no hierarchy of rights. So it is difficult to come to an ethically correct decision or action where the right of one person results in the right of another being breached. To recap, rights theory is a deontological theory. It is based on respect for the rights of others however, a major limitation of this theory is finding a resolution when the rights of one person conflicts with the rights of another.
IHL and Humanitarian Principles
 
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IHL and Humanitarian principles The Advanced IHL Learning Series are addressed to lecturers and trainers who wish to update their knowledge of the latest developments and challenges in international humanitarian law (IHL) and other related areas. They enable lecturers to update and deepen their expertise in topical issues, have access to teaching resources and introduce the topics in their course or training. What are the respective aims of IHL and the humanitarian principles? What are their sources? Who are they addressed to? Does IHL refer to the principles? What is the normative framework governing relief operations? How can the principles help foster respect for IHL? This Advanced IHL Learning Series provides lecturers with a wide range of resources to understand and teach these issues. For more information please visit: https://www.icrc.org/en/ihl-and-humanitarian-principles
Aristotle & Virtue Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #38
 
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This week we explore final ethical theory in this unit: Aristotle’s virtue theory. Hank explains the Golden Mean, and how it exists as the midpoint between vices of excess and deficiency. We’ll also discuss moral exemplars, and introduce the concept of “eudaimonia.” Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 972760 CrashCourse
Principles of Microecon 62 - Normative v Positive Economics
 
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Drawing an important distinction between normative and positive economics
Views: 1833 Lucas Engelhardt
Normative Framework for IDP Protection
 
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Jacopo Giorgi of IDMC presents a webinar with the following objectives: Identify the main characteristics of the international definition of "Internally Displaced Persons," Define the rationale for creating the IDP category, Provide an overview of the general bodies of international law relevant to internal displacement, and Present the internal principles on internal displacement and other IDP specific international frameworks.
Views: 727 DisasterReady
Ethics in Management
 
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Most ethical dilemmas involve a conflict between the needs of the part and the whole - the individual versus the organization or the organization versus society as a whole. Managers faced with these kinds of tough ethical choices often benefit from a normative strategy - one based on norms and values—to guide their decision making. Normative ethics uses several approaches to describe values for guiding ethical decision making. The utilitarian approach is a method of ethical decision making saying that the ethical choice is the one that produces the greatest good for the greatest number.The individualism approach is a decision-making approach suggesting that actions are ethical when they promote the individual’s best long-term interests, because with everyone pursuing self-interest, the greater good is served. The moral-rights approach holds that ethical decisions are those that best maintain the fundamental rights of the people affected by them. The justice approach says that ethical decisions must be based on standards of equity, fairness, and impartiality.Three types of justice are of concern to managers. Distributive justice requires that different treatment of individuals not be based on arbitrary characteristics. Procedural justice holds that rules should be clearly stated and consistently and impartially enforced. Compensatory justice argues that individuals should be compensated for the cost of their injuries by the party responsible, and individuals should not be held responsible for matters over which they have no control. The practical approach is a decision-making approach that sidesteps debates about what is right, good, or just, and bases decisions on the prevailing standards of the profession and the larger society. Managers can use various approaches based on norms and values to help them make ethical decisions. Ethics is the code of moral principles and values that governs the behaviors of a person or group with respect to what is right or wrong. Ethics can be more clearly understood when compared with behaviors governed by law and by free choice. Managers carry a tremendous responsibility for setting the ethical climate in an organization and can act as role models for ethical behavior.
Views: 498 Gregg Learning
Ethical theories
 
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An introduction to ethical theories for MGT230
Views: 9604 Kay Plummer
Deontology vs. Utilitarianism
 
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A moral dilemma of a father with a sick child
Views: 158367 Jason Miller
Normative Ethics
 
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heyyyo.
Views: 139 Obia Muoneke
What is DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS? What does DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS mean? DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS meaning
 
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BROWSE The Internet EASY way with The Audiopedia owned Lightina Browser Android app! INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.LightinaBrowser_8083351 What is DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS? What does DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS mean? DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS meaning - DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS definition - DEONTOLOGICAL ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Deontological ethics or deontology (from Greek ????, deon, "obligation, duty") is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on rules. It is sometimes described as "duty-" or "obligation-" or "rule-" based ethics, because rules "bind you to your duty." Deontological ethics is commonly contrasted to consequentialism, virtue ethics, and pragmatic ethics. In this terminology, action is more important than the consequences. The term deontological was first used to describe the current, specialised definition by C. D. Broad in his book, Five Types of Ethical Theory, which was published in 1930. Older usage of the term goes back to Jeremy Bentham, who coined it in c. 1826 to mean more generally "the knowledge of what is right and proper". The more general sense of the word is retained in French, especially in the term code de déontologie "ethical code", in the context of professional ethics. Deontology is the study of that which is an "obligation or duty," and consequent moral judgment on the actor on whether he or she has complied. In philosophy and religion, states Bocheński, there is an important distinction between deontic and epistemic authority. A typical example of epistemic authority, explains Anna Brożek, is "the relation of a teacher to his students; a typical example of deontic authority is the relation between an employer and his employee." A teacher has epistemic authority when making declarative sentences that the student presumes is reliable knowledge and appropriate but feels no obligation to accept or obey; in contrast, an employer has deontic authority in the act of issuing an order that the employee is obliged to accept and obey regardless of its reliability or appropriateness. Immanuel Kant's theory of ethics is considered deontological for several different reasons. First, Kant argues that to act in the morally right way, people must act from duty (deon). Second, Kant argued that it was not the consequences of actions that make them right or wrong but the motives of the person who carries out the action. Kant's argument that to act in the morally right way one must act purely from duty begins with an argument that the highest good must be both good in itself and good without qualification. Something is "good in itself" when it is intrinsically good, and "good without qualification", when the addition of that thing never makes a situation ethically worse. Kant then argues that those things that are usually thought to be good, such as intelligence, perseverance and pleasure, fail to be either intrinsically good or good without qualification. Pleasure, for example, appears not to be good without qualification, because when people take pleasure in watching someone suffer, this seems to make the situation ethically worse. He concludes that there is only one thing that is truly good: Nothing in the world—indeed nothing even beyond the world—can possibly be conceived which could be called good without qualification except a good will. Kant then argues that the consequences of an act of willing cannot be used to determine that the person has a good will; good consequences could arise by accident from an action that was motivated by a desire to cause harm to an innocent person, and bad consequences could arise from an action that was well-motivated. Instead, he claims, a person has a good will when he 'acts out of respect for the moral law'. People 'act out of respect for the moral law' when they act in some way because they have a duty to do so. So, the only thing that is truly good in itself is a good will, and a good will is only good when the willer chooses to do something because it is that person's duty, i.e. out of "respect" for the law. He defines respect as "the concept of a worth which thwarts my self-love."
Views: 8690 The Audiopedia
Applied Ethics 2 Religious Concepts That Affect Moral Principles
 
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This film briefly goes through the kinds of concepts that might influence the moral decisions that a Christian might make.
ACC320/acc620 Topic 1 positive vs normative
 
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A short video to distinguish positive and normative theory
Views: 1979 Monte Wynder
NORMATIVE ETHICS: Feminist Care Ethics
 
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In this video we will (1)examine the reasons which motivate some feminists to support feminist care ethics and (2) consider the debate between feminist and non-feminist philosophers as to the normative force and viability of FCE. As always, we will consider the motivations for FCE, the objections which can be raised by non-philosophers, and the replies which can be given by feminists in defense of FCE. Whether one supports or opposes feminism, anyone seeking to live an Examined Life ought at least to consider the arguments for and against FCE. One question we ought to ask from the start is ‘why feminist ethics?’ Given the number of ethical system which are already in the world today, one might be wary of the thought of yet another such contending system. The short answer is this: while it is not at all clear what normative force (if any) feminist ethics ought to occupy in society, it is always worth investigating newer ethical systems to gain an understanding of the ethical issues which any given society faces. Considering feminist ethics will be beneficial for all other ethical systems in that it will give theorists a different lens through which to assess the moral sphere. More so than most ethical systems, feminist ethics is particularly concerned with the realm of personal friendships and relationships. Feminist moral philosophers who reject non-feminist ethical systems overwhelmingly tend to reject the common thought which runs throughout Western moral philosophy that morality requires impartiality. “Impartiality says that from a moral point of view, all persons are considered equal and should be treated accordingly." Feminist philosophers like Alison Jaggar reject impartiality as a moral requirement (as we will see in future lessons, feminists are split on whether or not there ought to be legal requirements of impartiality) on the grounds that it does not seem to hold for our moral experiences in domestic life. A little reflection will show that we are naturally partial to the people in our lives who are family and friends. It is excessively psychologically demanding for much of humans to be held to a moral requirement of impartiality. Another point of departure by FCE from traditional ethics is the central role which our emotions purportedly ought to occupy in moral decision-making. Most people, that is, make everyday moral decisions while being guided by the emotions which their intuitions recommend. More emphasis ought to be given in moral theorizing to psychological and emotional growth and well being. Finally, FCE prizes moral virtues but typically rejects moral principles. There are some virtues in feminist ethics which are emphasized more than others. For example, compassion, kindness, love, sympathy are taken to be primary moral virtues. One question we might have is why one ought to hold these virtues as superior to others? According to philosopher and psychologist Carol Gilligan (see A Different Voice, Harvard University Press, 1982) the reason is rooted in the radically different ways in which men and women think about moral problems. “In moral decision making, men deliberate about rights, justice, and rules; women on the other hand, focus on personal relationships, caring for others, and being aware of peoples’ needs, feelings, and viewpoints” (Vaughn, 2015.) For Gilligan, reversing this trend so that compassion, kindness, love, and sympathy are prized rather than the abstract principles will help ensure a more moral outlook. *Note: FCE is not the only approach to feminist ethics, but it is more philosophically robust than other approaches to feminist ethics, one reason being that it engages and argues against (rather than dismissing) the literature and arguments of traditional ethical theories. ___________ Carol Gilligan - A Different Voice. (Harvard University Press,) 1982. Gilligan's book is the standard treatment for the subject of FCE, and should be read first in order to acquire a foundation for understanding the FCE literature which has since been published in books and journals. She also considers wider issues in applied ethics such as abortion, discrimination in the work place. women in the work place, welfare rights, sexual harassment, etc. _______ Cheshire Coulhoun, “Justice, Care, and Gender Bias,” The Journal of Philosophy, 85, 1988, 451-63. In this non-feminist critique of FCE, Calhoun grants FCE that male biases plague philosophy, but warns that moral philosophers ought to combat all philosophical biases and form a gender-neutral theory which is equally action-guiding for women and men. Moreover, FCE must be on guard against female biases in moral theorizing. ________ Lewis Vaughn - Beginning Ethics: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy. (Norton, 2015,) pp. 149-156. For a general introductory book in moral theory, Vaughn's book is as clear, robust, brief, and concise an introduction as any student of ethics could want.
First principles of health justice: a human right to be healthy | Sridhar Venkatapuram | TEDxLSHTM
 
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Sridhar Venkatapuram argues that every human being has a human right to the capability to be healthy. In this talk, he takes us through the first principles required for health to be a human right: a shift to thinking about health as a capability and a recognition that health and health inequalities are questions of social justice. Sridhar Venkatapuram has been at the forefront of health ethics and global health for over twenty years. His research and expertise is in global/public health, social epidemiology, human rights, ethics and philosophy. He aims to bridge normative reasoning, particularly about social justice, with relevant natural and social sciences related to human health. He has academic training in a range of disciplines including international relations, public health, sociology and political philosophy. His doctoral dissertation making the argument for a moral/human right to ‘the capability to be healthy’ was supervised by Melissa Lane, and examined and passed without corrections by Amartya Sen, Nobel prize winning economist and philosopher. It formed the basis of his first book titled Health Justice: An argument from the capabilities approach which has been described as a landmark achievement. He is currently writing a book on the modern history and current issues of global health ethics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 21667 TEDx Talks
Jeremy Bentham on Utilitarianism as a Moral Theory - Philosophy Core Concepts
 
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Get Bentham's book here - http://amzn.to/2xYcjW3 Support my work here - https://www.patreon.com/sadler Philosophy tutorials - https://reasonio.wordpress.com/tutorials/ This is a video in my new Core Concepts series -- designed to provide students and lifelong learners a brief discussion focused on one main concept from a classic philosophical text and thinker. This Core Concept video focuses on Jeremy Bentham's Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, and discusses the basic notion of his version of Utilitarianism as a moral theory. If you'd like to support my work producing videos like this, become a Patreon supporter! Here's the link to find out more - including the rewards I offer backers: https://www.patreon.com/sadler You can also make a direct contribution to help fund my ongoing educational projects, by clicking here: https://www.paypal.me/ReasonIO If you're interested in philosophy tutorial sessions with me - especially on Bentham or Utilitarianism more generally! - click here: https://reasonio.wordpress.com/tutorials/ You can find the copy of the text I am using for this sequence on Bentham's Principles of Morals and Legislation here - http://amzn.to/2xYcjW3
Views: 42399 Gregory B. Sadler
Theory #4 - Normative Social Influence
 
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A short film which describes the principle 'Normative Social Influence' and its realisation in an interactive system.
Views: 321 Sophia Conradi
Ethical Theories and Principles (Real Life Application)
 
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Ethical Theories and Principles (Real Life Application) Performance Task in Business Ethics by HRM 3
Views: 31 hanna padua
Kant's Moral Theory: Fairness and Justice
 
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Philosophy | Teaching | Seminars | Honors Joel B. Hunter In this video, we'll look at the importance of fairness and justice in Kant's moral theory. While utilitarians claim that the ultimate point of morality is to improve well-being, Immanuel Kant's moral theory emphasizes the importance of fairness and justice. When discussing moral issues, people often raise the issue of fairness by asking questions such as "What if everyone did that?" and "How would you like it if I did that to you?" The Golden Rule is an example of a moral rule based on the latter question. These questions reveal that we often object when someone makes an exception for themselves about a moral rule while expecting others to keep it. We seem to expect that everyone ought to apply moral rules consistently. However, these two questions fail to provide foolproof tests of the morality of actions. Some actions, such as remaining celibate, can be morally permissible even if the consequences of everyone doing the same would be disastrous. Furthermore, as the existence of principled fanatics makes clear, one's actions might be immoral even if one would have no problem with everyone else behaving the same way. Kant provides a test for the morality of actions that aims to avoid these problems. According to Kant, an act is morally acceptable if and only if its maxim is universalizable. A maxim is the principle one gives to oneself when acting; it states what one is going to do and why one is going to do it. A maxim is universalizable if and only if one's goal could be achieved in a world in which everyone acted on that maxim. For example, a maxim that states that one will lie whenever doing so is convenient would not be universalizable because in a world in which everyone followed such a maxim, no one would trust the promises of others, and not only would promises be meaningless, lying would be futile, too! Kant thought that all immoral action is irrational because he believed the principle of universalizability to be the fundamental principle of morality and that to violate the principle is to act inconsistently. The principle of universalizability fails as a general test for the morality of our actions, however. The existence of principled fanatics shows this to be the case: the maxim that one will do whatever it takes (including killing) to protect the beauty of one's lawn seems to pass the test, but killing to protect one's lawn is clearly immoral. Kant also believed that the moral rules prohibiting certain actions, such as lying, are absolute—i.e., never permissibly broken. This is not required by the principle of universalizability, however, and seems implausible in certain cases (such as lying to prevent a murder).
Views: 139 Joel B Hunter

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