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Russian SUKHOI SU 35 performing COBRA MANOEUVRE Awesome pilot skills
 
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Fourth-generation jet fighter is a general classification of fighter aircraft in service from approximately 1980 to present day, and represent design concepts of the 1970s. Fourth-generation designs are heavily influenced by lessons learned from the previous generation of combat aircraft. Long-range air-to-air missiles, originally thought to make dogfighting obsolete, proved less influential than expected precipitating a renewed emphasis on maneuverability. Meanwhile, the growing costs of military aircraft in general and the demonstrated success of aircraft such as the F-4 Phantom II gave rise to the popularity of multirole fighters in parallel with the advances marking the so-called fourth generation. The Sukhoi Su-30 (Cyrillic: Сухой Су-30; NATO reporting name: Flanker-C) is a twin-engine, two-seat supermaneuverable fighter aircraft developed by Russia's Sukhoi Aviation Corporation. It is a multirole fighter for all-weather, air-to-air and air-to-surface deep interdiction missions. The Su-30 started out as an internal development project in the Sukhoi Su-27 family by Sukhoi. The design plan was revamped and the name was made official by the Russian Defense Ministry in 1996. Of the Flanker family, only the Su-27, Su-30, Su-34 and Su-35 have been ordered into serial production by the Defense Ministry. All the others, such as Su-37, were prototypes. The Su-30 has two distinct version branches, manufactured by competing organisations: KnAAPO and the Irkut Corporation, both of which come under the Sukhoi group's umbrella. KnAAPO manufactures the Su-30MKK and the Su-30MK2, which were designed for and sold to China, and later Indonesia, Venezuela and Vietnam. Due to KnAAPO's involvement from the early stages of developing Su-35, these are basically a two-seat version of the mid-1990s Su-35. The Chinese chose an older but lighter radar so the canards could be omitted in return for increased payload. It is a fighter with both air superiority and attack capabilities, generally similar to the U.S.F-15E.[3] The Sukhoi Su-35 (Russian: Сухой Су-35; NATO reporting name: Flanker-E) is a designation for two separate heavily-upgraded derivatives of the Su-27 'Flanker'. They are single-seat, twin-engine supermaneuverable multirole fighters, designed by Sukhoi and built by Komsomolsk-on-Amur Aircraft Production Association (KnAAPO). The first variant was designed during the 1980s, when Sukhoi was looking to upgrade its high-performance Su-27, and was initially known as the Su-27M. Later re-designated Su-35, this derivative incorporates aerodynamic refinements to increase manoeuvrability, enhanced avionics, longer range, and a more powerful engine. The first Su-35 prototype, converted from a Su-27, made its maiden flight in June 1988. More than a dozen of these were built with some used by the Russian Knights aerobatic demonstration team. The first Su-35 design was later modified into the Su-37 with thrust-vectoring engines and used as a technology demonstrator. A sole Su-35UB two-seat trainer was built in the late 1990s that, despite its name, shares a strong resemblance to the Su-30MK family. f-18 f-15 f-16 f-14 Eurofighter Typhoon Rafale
Views: 4186628 ArmedForcesUpdate
DEADLY ACCURATE Patria Nemo Navy 120mm Mortar System unveiled in Finland
 
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navy naval mortar finland patria NEMO from NEw MOrtar, is a single 120 mm unmanned mortar turret currently being developed by Patria Weapons System Oy PWS in Finland. It is a lighter version of the AMOS mortar system, which is also being field tested. The NEMO can be fitted to most APCs and also to smaller landing craft, like the Finnish Jurmo class landing craft or the Swedish Combat Boat 90. The first customer of the weapon system was the Slovenian Army,who ordered 24, while the United Arab Emirates Naval Forces bought 12 patrol boats, where some were to be equipped with NEMO mortars. Saudi Arabia bought 36 turrets to be equipped on its LAV II vehicles. Patria is a Finnish provider of defence, security and aviation life-cycle support services and technology solutions. Patria is owned by the state of Finland (73.2%) and Airbus Group (26.8%). Products and services Armoured wheeled vehicles, mortar systems and ammunition products as well as their life cycle support services. Life cycle support services for aircraft and helicopters as well as pilot training. Maintenance of army material for the Finnish Defence Forces. Development and integration of systems for command and control and situational awareness as well as their life cycle support services. As of 5 September 2008, Patria is under investigation by the Finnish National Bureau of Investigation on its vehicle project in Slovenia and howitzer project in Egypt.[3] The company's former CEO Jorma Wiitakorpi resigned on August 18, 2008, when the investigation was still ongoing. He was succeeded by former board member Heikki Allonen.[4] Furthermore, several other employees have been arrested on charges of bribery. The case is ongoing and currently (as of 5 September 2008) the criminal investigation is underway. Yleisradio's investigative program MOT published details of the case, causing a scandal in Slovenia, since the Slovenian Government including then-Prime Minister Janez Janša was allegedly involved. Finland (Listeni/ˈfɪnlənd/; Finnish: Suomi [suomi] ( listen); Swedish: Finland [ˈfɪnlɑːnɖ]), officially the Republic of Finland,[7] is a Nordic country situated in the Fennoscandian region of Northern Europe. It is bordered by Sweden to the west, Norway to the north, Russia to the east, and Estonia to the south across the Gulf of Finland. As of 2013, Finland's population was around 5.5 million, with the majority concentrated in its southern regions.[8] In terms of area, it is the eighth largest country in Europe and the most sparsely populated country in the European Union. Finland is a parliamentary republic with a central government based in the capital of Helsinki, local governments in 336 municipalities[9][10] and an autonomous region, the Åland Islands. About one million residents live in the Greater Helsinki area (consisting of Helsinki, Espoo, Vantaa and Kauniainen), which also produces a third of the country's GDP. Other large cities include Tampere, Turku, Oulu, Jyväskylä, Lahti, and Kuopio. From the late 12th until 1809, Finland was part of Sweden, a legacy reflected in the prevalence of the Swedish language and its official status. It then became an autonomous Grand Duchy within the Russian Empire until the Russian Revolution, which prompted the Finnish Declaration of Independence. This was followed by a civil war where the pro-Bolshevik "Reds" were defeated by the pro-conservative "Whites" with support from the German Empire. After a brief attempt to establish a monarchy, Finland became a republic. Finland's experience of World War II involved three separate conflicts: the Winter War (1939--1940) and Continuation War (1941--1944) against the Soviet Union and the Lapland War (1944--1945) against Nazi Germany. Following the end of the war, Finland joined the United Nations in 1955 and established an official policy of neutrality. Nevertheless, it remained fairly active on the world stage, joining the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 1969, the European Union in 1995, and the eurozone at its inception in 1999. Finland was a relative latecomer to industrialisation, remaining a largely agrarian country until the 1950s. Thereafter, it rapidly developed an advanced economy while building an extensive Nordic-style welfare state, resulting in widespread prosperity and one of the highest per capita incomes in the world.[4] Subsequently, Finland is a top performer in numerous metrics of national performance, including education, economic competitiveness, civil liberties, quality of life, and human development.[11][12][13][14][15][16] Finland is also a member of the United Nations, the Council of Europe and the World Trade Organization.
Views: 538906 ArmedForcesUpdate
Worlds MOST FEARED !!! US Navy SEALS promo video
 
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A great promotional video of the US Navy SEALS. The United States Navy's Sea, Air, Land Teams, commonly known as the Navy SEALs, are the U.S. Navy's principal special operations force and a part of the Naval Special Warfare Command and United States Special Operations Command.[3] The SEALs' duty is to conduct small-unit maritime military operations which originate from, and return to a river, ocean, swamp, delta, or coastline. SEALs can negotiate shallow water areas such as the Persian Gulf coastline, where large ships and submarines are limited due to depth.[4] "SEAL" is always capitalized in reference to members of the Naval Special Warfare community. The Navy SEALs are trained to operate in all environments (Sea, Air, and Land) for which they are named. SEALs are also prepared to operate in a variety of climates, such as desert, arctic, and jungle. All SEALs are male members of the United States Navy.[4][5][6][7] The CIA's highly secretive Special Activities Division (SAD) and more specifically its elite Special Operations Group (SOG) recruits operators from the SEAL Teams.[8] Joint Navy SEALs and CIA operations go back to the MACV-SOG during the Vietnam War.[9] This cooperation still exists today and is seen in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.[10][11] History[edit] This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2013) Origins[edit] The modern day U.S. Navy SEALs can trace their roots to World War II.[4] The United States Navy recognized the need for the covert reconnaissance of landing beaches and coastal defenses. As a result, the Amphibious Scout and Raider School was established in 1942 at Fort Pierce, Florida.[7] The Scouts and Raiders were formed in September of that year, just nine months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, from the Observer Group, a joint U.S. Army-Marine-Navy unit Scouts and Raiders[edit] Recognizing the need for a beach reconnaissance force, a select group of Army and Navy personnel assembled at Amphibious Training Base Little Creek, Virginia on August 15, 1942 to begin Amphibious Scouts and Raiders (joint) training. The Scouts and Raiders mission was to identify and reconnoiter the objective beach, maintain a position on the designated beach prior to a landing, and guide the assault waves to the landing beach.[4] The first group included Phil H. Bucklew, the "Father of Naval Special Warfare," after whom the Naval Special Warfare Center building is named. Commissioned in October 1942, this group saw combat in November 1942 during Operation Torch on the North African coast. Scouts and Raiders also supported landings in Sicily, Salerno, Anzio, Normandy, and southern France.[12] A second group of Scouts and Raiders, code-named Special Service Unit No. 1, was established on 7 July 1943, as a joint and combined operations force. The first mission, in September 1943, was at Finschafen on New Guinea. Later operations were at Gasmata, Arawe, Cape Gloucester, and the East and South coast of New Britain, all without any loss of personnel. Conflicts arose over operational matters, and all non-Navy personnel were reassigned. The unit, renamed 7th Amphibious Scouts, received a new mission, to go ashore with the assault boats, buoy channels, erect markers for the incoming craft, handle casualties, take offshore soundings, clear beach obstacles and maintain voice communications linking the troops ashore, incoming boats and nearby ships. The 7th Amphibious Scouts conducted operations in the Pacific for the duration of the conflict, participating in more than 40 landings.[4] The third and final Scouts and Raiders organization operated in China. Scouts and Raiders were deployed to fight with the Sino-American Cooperative Organization, or SACO. To help bolster the work of SACO, Admiral Ernest J. King ordered that 120 officers and 900 men be trained for "Amphibious Raider" at the Scout and Raider school at Fort Pierce, Florida. They formed the core of what was envisioned as a "guerrilla amphibious organization of Americans and Chinese operating from coastal waters, lakes and rivers employing small steamboats and sampans." While most Amphibious Raider forces remained at Camp Knox in Calcutta, three of the groups saw active service. They conducted a survey of the upper Yangtze River in the spring of 1945 and, disguised as coolies, conducted a detailed three-month survey of the Chinese coast from Shanghai to Kitchioh Wan, near Hong Kong.[4] Naval Combat Demolition Units[edit] In September 1942, 17 Navy salvage personnel arrived at ATB Little Creek, VA for a week long course in demolitions, explosive cable cutting and commando raiding techniques. On November 10, 1942, the first combat demolition unit successfully cut cable and net barriers across the Wadi Sebou River during Operation Torch in North Africa.
Views: 730520 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER DEADLY patria nemo mortar system from Finland
 
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Finland unveiled it's new mortar weapon system for military ground forces. NEMO (from "new mortar"), is a single 120 mm unmanned mortar turret currently being developed by Patria Weapons System Oy (PWS) in Finland. It is a lighter version of the AMOS mortar system, which is also being field tested. The NEMO can be fitted to most APCs and also to smaller landing craft, like the Finnish Jurmo class landing craft or the Swedish Combat Boat 90. The first customer of the weapon system was the Slovenian Army,[1] who ordered 24, while the United Arab Emirates Naval Forces bought 12 patrol boats, where some were to be equipped with NEMO mortars.[2] Saudi Arabia bought 36 turrets to be equipped on its LAV II vehicles.[3] Technical information[edit] Barrel: Calibre: 120 mm Length: 3 m Angles: -3° to +85° Side angles: n × 360° Lock: half-automatic wedge Lifting device: hydro-pneumatic Fire preparation time: less than 30 seconds Leave preparation time: less than 10 seconds Rate of fire: 10 shots/minute (max); 7 shots/minute (continuous) Complement: 3 men Weight: ca. 1,500 kg Patria is a Finnish provider of defence, security and aviation life-cycle support services and technology solutions. Patria is owned by the state of Finland (73.2%) and Airbus Group (26.8%), but Airbus agreed to sell their stake to the government in December 2014.[1] Products[edit] Products and services Armoured wheeled vehicles, mortar systems and ammunition products as well as their life cycle support services. Life cycle support services for aircraft and helicopters as well as pilot training. Maintenance of army material for the Finnish Defence Forces. Development and integration of systems for command and control and situational awareness as well as their life cycle support services. A mortar is a weapon that fires explosive projectiles known as (mortar) bombs at low velocities, short ranges, and high-arcing ballistic trajectories. It is typically muzzle-loading with a short barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. History[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have existed for hundreds of years, first seeing use in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Fatih Sultan Mehmed. A European account of the 1456 siege of Belgrade by Giovanni da Tagliacozzo credits the Ottoman Turks for using seven mortars that fired "stone shots one Italian mile high".[1] The speed of these was apparently slow enough that casualties could be avoided by posting observers that gave warning of their trajectories.[2] Early mortars, such as the Pumhart von Steyr, were also large and heavy, and could not be easily transported. Simply made, these weapons were no more than iron bowls reminiscent of the kitchen and apothecary mortars from where they drew their name. An early transportable mortar was invented by Baron Menno van Coehoorn (Siege of Grave, 1673[3]). An early use of these more mobile mortars as field (rather than siege) weapons was by British forces in the suppression of the 1719 Jacobite rising at the Battle of Glen Shiel. Wide angle trajectory mortars held a great advantage over standard field guns in the rough terrain of the West Highlands in Scotland. Coehorn-type mortars of approximately 180 pounds (82 kg) weight were used by both sides during the American Civil War. At the Siege of Vicksburg, General US Grant reported making such mortars "by taking logs of the toughest wood that could be found, boring them out for six or twelve-pound shells and binding them with stong iron bands. These answered as coehorns, and shells were successfully thrown from them into the trenches of the enemy." [4] The mortar had fallen out of general use by the Napoleonic era and interest in the weapon was only revived at the beginning of the 20th century. During the Russo-Japanese War, lieutenant-general Leonid Gobyato of the Imperial Russian Army applied the principles of indirect fire from closed firing positions in the field and, with the collaboration of General Roman Kondratenko, he designed the first mortar that fired navy shells. The German Army studied the Siege of Port Arthur, where heavy artillery had been unable to destroy defensive structures like barbed wire and bunkers. The solution they developed was a short-barrelled rifled muzzle-loading mortar called the minenwerfer, and was built in three sizes. Recognizing the advantages of the minenwerfer in trench warfare, production was stepped up and, by 1918, the numbers had increased dramatically to 1,234 heavy, 2,361 medium and 12,329 light minenwerfer. Modern portable mortar It was not until the Stokes trench mortar devised by Sir Wilfred Stokes in 1915 during the First World War, that the modern mortar transportable by one person was born. In the conditions of trench warfare, there was a great need for a versatile and easily portable weapon that could be manned by troops undercover in the trenches.
Views: 93783 ArmedForcesUpdate
Indian Air Force Su-30 compeats with Royal Air Force Eurofighter Typhoon in exercise
 
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Russian made Indian Air Force Su-30 MKI defeated British Royal Air force Euro fighter Typhoon in training exercise. Red-faced RAF ‘outgunned’ by Indian pilots flying Russian SU-30MKI Flanker jets in joint exercise. Indian Air Force pilots claim they outflew and outgunned their Royal Air Force (RAF) counterparts during a joint exercise held in the UK. The Indian pilots claim they outperformed the RAF’s Typhoon crews with their Russian made jets during an Indo-UK exercise named Operation Indradhanush, which was held over 10 days in Lincolnshire last month. The Indians are equipped with the Russian-designed SU-30MKI Flanker fighter. They claimed they won their dogfights by an impressive 12-0. An RAF source was quick to talk down the claims, telling the International Business Times, “Our analysis does not match what has been reported, RAF pilots and the Typhoon performed well throughout the exercise with and against the Indian Air Force. “Both [forces] learnt a great deal from the exercise and the RAF look forward to the next opportunity to train alongside the IAF.” Tony Osborne, the London bureau chief of Aviation Week, backed the RAF’s comments, telling the Independent, “These cricket-style scores claimed by the IAF look impressive but should be treated with caution and certainly not as a realistic gauge of combat capability. “We have to view these scores through the haze of pilot bravado, national pride and also some political correctness. “Nonetheless, the SU-30MKI is one of the aircraft that the Typhoon was designed to tackle and defeat, and no doubt in the right hands would present a potent challenge,” he acknowledged. Issues with the Typhoon have been raised in the past. In June, the UK’s influential National Audit Office (NAO) said that the multi-billion pound Typhoon training scheme, which was outsourced to a private consortium, was six years behind schedule. Auditors warned if the scheme is not brought up to speed it could leave the UK without properly trained aircrews. The Ascent contract, designed to be fulfilled by a consortium composed of defense firms Babcock International and Lockheed Martin, was intended to be running at full capacity by 2014. The NAO expects it will not be hitting its goals until 2019 at the current rate of progress. The scheme is for training pilots and crew to operate the Royal Navy’s Hellcat helicopters, the British Army’s Apache attack helicopters as well as the Royal Air Force’s Typhoon fighter jets. “Implementing the new flying training has been challenging,” NAO head Amyas Morse said. Su-30 MKIs are among the most advanced Russian-designed warplanes operated by a foreign military. They were developed and initially produced in Russia, but India started producing them in 2004 under a license. The Russian military ordered a domestic variant of the fighter based on the Indian version, replacing some equipment to comply with Russian Air Forces standards. The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force. Formed towards the end of the First World War on 1 April 1918,[3] it is the oldest independent air force in the world.[4] Following victory over the Central Powers in 1918 the RAF emerged as – at the time – the largest air force in the world.[5] Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history, in particular, playing a large part in the Second World War where it fought its most famous campaign, the Battle of Britain.[6] The RAF's mission is to support the objectives of the British Ministry of Defence (MoD), which are to "provide the capabilities needed: to ensure the security and defence of the United Kingdom and overseas territories, including against terrorism; to support the Government’s foreign policy objectives particularly in promoting international peace and security."[1] The RAF describe its mission statement as "... [to provide] An agile, adaptable and capable Air Force that, person for person, is second to none, and that makes a decisive air power contribution in support of the UK Defence Mission."[7] The mission statement is supported by the RAF's definition of air power, which guides its strategy. Air power is defined as: "The ability to project power from the air and space to influence the behaviour of people or the course of events."[8] Today the Royal Air Force maintains an operational fleet of various types of aircraft,[9] described by the RAF as being "leading-edge" in terms of technology.[10] This largely consists of fixed-wing aircraft, including: fighter and strike aircraft, airborne early warning and control aircraft, ISTAR and SIGINT aircraft, aerial refueling aircraft and strategic and tactical transport aircraft. The majority of the RAF's rotary-wing aircraft form part of the tri-service Joint Helicopter Command in support of ground forces.
Views: 632156 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER POWERFUL Turkish Armed Forces military rifles
 
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A great promo video of the Turkish armed forces military rifles. The MKEK MPT (stands for Turkish: Milli Piyade Tüfeği, English: National Infantry Rifle)[3][4] is a modular rifle designed by MKEK & Kalekalıp and produced by MKEK to meet the demands of the Turkish Armed Forces and to replace its aging Heckler & Koch G3 battle rifles due to most of them being near the end of their service life.[5][6] The MPT-76 was designed for robust high altitude, all weather, extremely hot and extremely cold arctic mountain warfare as well as combat on easier terrain. It is certified to operate under dusty, muddy, wet, and areas of high and low atmospheric pressure such as high mountain or deep sea environments. The MKEK MPT is a rifle intended to take abuse and extreme mistreatment and still maintain high accuracy and reliability in order to survive in true battle environments.[2][7] Ankara has invested 3 Million USD into the project.[5] It made its first public appearance at the Eurosatory 2014,[8] ADEX 2014[9][10] and the MSPO 2014 events.[11] History[edit] After the first prototypes were built in 2008 as the Mehmetçik-1 in 5.56×45mm NATO,[12][13] the rifle received negative feedback from Turkish soldiers testing it who reported that they preferred the 7.62×51mm NATO round which has far greater knockdown power and range, as used in their G3 service rifles. The proposed Mehmetcik-1 was cancelled after the first prototype and engineers started over again with a battle rifle design instead. The first batch of 200 MPT-76s were delivered on May 18, 2014 and received positive feedback.[8][14] The rifle was reported to be extremely accurate, reliable, and had impressive knockdown power and outmatched the G3 in all categories. The Turkish Army plans to phase out its G3 throughout 2015 and to make the MPT-76 its main service rifle by the end of 2016.[15] Azerbaijan plans to produce parts of the rifle in cooperation with Turkey.[9] Design[edit] The MPT-76 is designed for robust and unconditional combat all while without compromising accuracy. The need for such a rifle surfaced during the Turkish-Kurdish conflict and the anti-terror skirmishes of the Turkish Army against the PKK in the countries south east borders with Iraq, an area of vast mountains with extreme climates and terrain. Its design was based on the AR-15, but with the gas piston system influenced by the HK 417.[8][16] It has a picatinny rail system and mounting options for an under-barrel shotgun and grenade launcher.[17] Planned variants include 5.56 NATO and 7.62 NATO versions of the MPT, though it is unknown if the Turkish Army will adopt the former.[18] Left and right-hand versions of the MPT are also planned.[18] The MKEK MPT-76 with a bipod Type Battle rifle Place of origin Turkey Service history In service 2014–present[1] Used by See Users Production history Designer MKEK Designed 2009-2014 Manufacturer MKEK Produced 2014-present[1] Specifications Weight 4.1 kg (9.0 lb) Length 920 mm (36 in) [2] Barrel length 410 mm (16 in) Cartridge 7.62×51mm NATO 5.56×45mm NATO Action Gas-operated, rotating bolt Rate of fire 650 rounds/min [2] Muzzle velocity 800 m/s (2,600 ft/s) [2] Effective firing range 600 m (660 yd) [2] Feed system 20-round detachable magazine[2] Sights Iron sights or various optics Variants[edit] The following are planned to be in production:[18] MPT-76 Carbine with 12 inch barrel MPT-76 Battle Rifle with 16 inch barrel MPT-76 Designated Marksman's Rifle with 20 inch barrel Users[edit] Azerbaijan: Requested to take part in the project as a fellow Turkic nation. An undisclosed number of rifles have been delivered to Azeri Forces. Parts of the MPT is to be produced in Azerbaijan while the Azerbaijani Land Forces plans to phase out the AK-74M1 with the MPT.[19] Turkey: Received 200 MPT-76 rifles.[4][14] 5,000 rifles out of the ordered 35,000 will be delivered by years end, following suggestions on changes to be made. The Turkish Armed Forces eventually plans on buying up to 500,000 rifles, making the MPT its main service and combat rifle for the Turkish Army all while decommissioning the aging HK G3 out of service.[8]
Views: 234241 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS LARGEST HELICOPTER Russian Mil V 12 Mi 12 bigger than us army Boeing CH-47 Chinook
 
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The Mil V-12 (also referred to as the Mi-12, NATO reporting name Homer) is the largest helicopter ever built. The name "Mi-12" would have been the name for the production helicopter. Since the V-12 never went into production and only two prototypes were built, the name "Mi-12" was never officially adopted.[1] Development was the result of a need for a heavy lift helicopter capable of carrying major missile components and dropping them into silos without the benefit of road infrastructure.[2][clarification needed] Production began on the V-12 prototype in 1965 with the goal of lifting no less than 30,000 kg (~33 short tons). The first prototype made its first lift-off on 27 June 1967. After a few oscillations in close proximity to the ground the V-12 made a rough touchdown on one wheel, resulting in a burst tire and a bent wheel disk. Even though the damage was insignificant, it was reported in the Western press that the prototype had suffered severe damage, and even to this day the rumor persists that the prototype had crashed fatally.[1] The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is an American twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. Its primary roles are troop movement, artillery emplacement and battlefield resupply. It has a wide loading ramp at the rear of the fuselage and three external-cargo hooks. With a top speed of 170 knots (196 mph, 315 km/h) the helicopter is faster than contemporary utility and attack helicopters of the 1960s. The CH-47 is among the heaviest lifting Western helicopters. Its name is from the Native American Chinook people. The Chinook was designed and initially produced by Boeing Vertol in the early 1960s; it is now produced by Boeing Rotorcraft Systems. It is one of the few aircraft of that era -- along with the fixed-wing Lockheed C-130 Hercules cargo aircraft -- that remain in production and front-line service, with over 1,179 built to date. The helicopter has been sold to 16 nations with the U.S. Army and the Royal Air Force (see Boeing Chinook (UK variants)) its largest users. The United States Army (USA) is the main branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven U.S. uniformed services. The modern army has its roots in the Continental Army which was formed on 14 June 1775,[3] to meet the demands of the American Revolutionary War before the establishment of the United States. The Congress of the Confederation officially created the United States Army on 3 June 1784[4][5] after the end of the Revolutionary War to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The army considers itself to be descended from the Continental Army and thus dates its inception from the origins of that force.[3] The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation (Russian: Вооружённые Си́лы Росси́йской Федера́ции, tr. Vooruzhonnije Síly Rossíyskoj Federátsii) are the military services of Russia, established after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. On 7 May 1992, Boris Yeltsin signed a presidential decree establishing the Russian Ministry of Defence and placing all Soviet Armed Forces troops on the territory of the RSFSR under Russian control.[3] The commander-in-chief of the armed forces is the president of Russia. Although the Russian armed forces were formed in 1992, the Russian military dates its roots back to the times of the Kievan Rus'. The number of troops is specified by decree of the President of Russia. On 1 January 2008, a number of 2,019,629 units, including military of 1,134,800 units, was set.[4] In 2010 the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) estimated that the Russian Armed Forces numbered about 1,040,000 active troops and in the region of 2,035,000 reserves, (largely ex-conscripts)[1] but a significant military reform is underway which will cut the number of active troops. Russia Listeni/ˈrʌʃə/ or /ˈrʊʃə/ (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya, IPA: [rɐˈsʲijə] ( listen)), also officially known as the Russian Federation[10] (Russian: Российская Федерация, tr. Rossiyskaya Federatsiya, IPA: [rɐˈsʲijskəjə fʲɪdʲɪˈrat͡sɨjə] ( listen)), is a country in northern Eurasia.[11] It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk, and the US state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At 17,075,400 square kilometres (6,592,800 sq mi), Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012.[12]
Views: 1412228 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLD CHAMPION RC Helicopter pilot Demonstrates his Awesome Skills
 
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Great demo by world champion rc helicopter pilot Radio-controlled helicopters (also RC helicopters) are model aircraft which are distinct from RC airplanes because of the differences in construction, aerodynamics, and flight training. Several basic designs of RC helicopters exist, of which some (such as those with collective pitch control) are more maneuverable than others. The more maneuverable designs are often harder to fly, but benefit from greater aerobatic capabilities. Flight controls allow pilots to control the collective (or throttle, on fixed pitch helicopters), the cyclic controls (pitch and roll), and the tail rotor (yaw). Controlling these in unison enables the helicopter to perform the same maneuvers as full-sized helicopters, such as hovering and backwards flight, and many that full-sized helicopters cannot, such as inverted flight (where collective pitch control provides negative blade pitch to hold heli up inverted, and pitch/yaw controls must be reversed by pilot). The various helicopter controls are effected by means of small servo motors, commonly known as servos. A piezoelectric gyroscope sensor is typically used on the tail rotor (yaw) control to counter wind- and torque-reaction-induced tail movement. Most newer helicopters have gyro-stabilization on the other 2 axes of rotation (pitch and roll) as well. Such 3-axis gyro is typically called a flybarless controller, so-called because it eliminates the need for a flybar. The engines typically used to be methanol-powered two-stroke motors, but electric brushless motors combined with a high-performance lithium polymer battery (LiPo) are now more common and provide improved efficiency, performance and lifespan compared to brushed motors, while decreasing prices bring them within reach of hobbyists. Gasoline and jet turbine engines are also used.[1] Just like full sized helicopters, model helicopter rotors turn at high speeds and can cause severe injuries. Several deaths have occurred as recently as 2013. Types of R/C helicopters[edit] Common power sources of R/C helicopters are glow fuel (also called nitro fuel, nitromethane-methanol), electric batteries, gasoline (petrol) and turbine engines. For the first 40 years, glow fuel helicopters were the most common type produced. However, in the last 10 years, electric powered helicopters have matured to a point where power and flight times have equaled glow fuel helicopters. There have been two main types of systems to control the main rotors, mechanical mixing and cyclic/collective pitch mixing (CCPM). Most earlier helicopters used mechanical mixing. Today, nearly all R/C helicopter use CCPM. Practical electric helicopters are a recent development but have rapidly developed and become more common, overtaking glow fuel helicopters in common use. Turbine helicopters are also increasing in popularity, although the high cost puts them out of reach of most people. Electric Two small electric helicopters emerged in the mid-1990s. These were the Kalt Whisper and the Kyosho EP Concept, flying on 7–8 × 1.2 Ah NiCad batteries with brushed motors. However, the 540-sized brushed-motors were on the limit of current draw, often 20–25 amps on the more powerful motors, hence brush and commutator problems were common. Recent advancements in battery technology are making electric flying more feasible in terms of flying time. Lithium polymer (LiPo) batteries are able to provide the high current required for high performance aerobatics while still remaining very light. Typical flight times are 4–12 minutes depending on the flying style and battery capacity. In the past electric helicopters were used mainly indoors due to the small size and lack of fumes. Larger electric helicopters suitable for outdoor flight and advanced aerobatics have become a reality over the last few years and have become very popular. Their quietness has made them very popular for flying sites close to residential areas and in places such as Germany where there are strict noise restrictions. Nitro helicopters have also been converted to electric power by commercial and homemade kits. The smallest remote-controlled production model helicopter made (Guinness World Records 2006) is the Picooz Extreme MX-1 sold at many toy stores (although this is infrared controlled, not radio), electronics stores and internet stores, costing about $30 (£28). The next smallest is the standard Picooz helicopter. Several models are in contention for the title of the smallest non-production remote-controlled helicopter, including the Pixelito family of micro helicopters, the Proxflyer family, and the Micro flying robot. Glow fuel (nitro fuel)[edit] Glow fuel, or nitro fuel helicopters (not to be confused with gas, or gasoline powered helicopters) have been made in several sizes over the years. These are referred to as the "class" of the helicopter. They include 1/2A class, 15 class, 30 class, 50 class, 60 class and 90 class.
Views: 2447712 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS FASTEST Strategic Aircraft Tu-160 Take Off & Landing
 
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The Tupolev Tu-160 Beliy Lebed (or White Swan,[1] Russian: Туполев Ту-160, NATO reporting name: Blackjack) is a supersonic, variable-sweep wing heavy strategic bomber designed by the Tupolev Design Bureau in the Soviet Union. Although several civil and military transport aircraft are larger in overall dimensions, the Tu-160 is the world's largest combat aircraft, largest supersonic aircraft and largest variable-sweep aircraft built. Entering service in 1987, the Tu-160 was the last strategic bomber designed for the Soviet Union. The Long Range Aviation branch of the Russian Air Force has 16 aircraft with fewer in active use. The Tu-160 active fleet has been undergoing upgrades to electronics systems since the early 2000s. The Tu-160M modernisation programme has begun with the first new updated aircraft delivered in December 2014. Development[edit] Origins[edit] The first competition for a supersonic strategic heavy bomber was launched in the Soviet Union in 1967. In 1972, the Soviet Union launched a new multi-mission bomber competition to create a new supersonic, variable-geometry ("swing-wing") heavy bomber with a maximum speed of Mach 2.3, in response to the US Air Force B-1 bomber project. The Tupolev design, dubbed Aircraft 160M, with a lengthened blended wing layout and incorporating some elements of the Tu-144, competed against the Myasishchev M-18 and the Sukhoi T-4 designs.[2] Tu-160 in flight Work on the new Soviet bomber continued despite an end to the B-1A and in the same year, the design was accepted by the government committee. The prototype was photographed by an airline passenger at a Zhukovsky Airfield in November 1981, about a month before the aircraft's first flight on 18 December 1981. Production was authorized in 1984, beginning at Kazan Aircraft Production Association.[3] Modernization[edit] Like many Soviet weapon systems, the Tu-160 struggled to overcome unreliable components and a lack of maintenance during the 1990s.[citation needed] The original systems were faulty and required major rework using up-to-date computer chip and circuit boards.[citation needed] The modernised aircraft were then accepted into Russian service again after testing in late 2005.[4][5] The upgrade also integrated the ability to launch two new conventional versions of the long-range Kh-55 nuclear cruise missile—the Kh-101 and Kh-555.[6][7][8] Although Russia has overstated the progress of the modernisation project, it seems that the project has been restricted by the lack of up-to-date facilities to keep aircraft flying.[citation needed] This resulted in the delivery of a new-build aircraft but the "first modernised Tu-160" in July 2006 did not receive new avionics, although they were planned for the new airframe.[5][9][10] The modernisation appears to be split into two phases, concentrating on life extension with some initial communication–navigation updates, followed by 10 aircraft receiving new engines and capability upgrades after 2016.[4] The first refitted aircraft was delivered to the VVS in May 2008; a follow-up contract to overhaul three aircraft in 2013 cost RUR3.4 billion (US$103m).[11] The first updated M-model Tu-160 was delivered in December 2014.[12][13][14] Although the phase I update was due to be completed by 2016, industrial limitations may delay it to 2019 or beyond.[15] Although Kuznetsov designed an NK-32M engine with improved reliability over the troublesome NK-32 engines, its successor company has struggled to deliver working units. Metallist-Samara JSC had not produced new engines for a decade when it was given a contract in 2011 to overhaul 26 of the existing engines, by two years later, only four were finished.[15] Ownership and financial concerns hinder the prospects of a new production line; the firm insists it needs a minimum of 20 engines ordered per year but the government is only prepared to pay for 4–6 engines per year.[15][16] A further improved engine has been bench tested and may enter production in 2016 or later.[4] On 29 April 2015, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu was quoted as saying that Russia was resuming production of the Tu-160.[17][18] On 28 May 2015 the Russian news agency TASS: Russia reported that the Russian Air Force will purchase at least 50 new-build Tu-160s and that production of the aircraft will restart at the Kazan aviation plant.[19] General Viktor Bondarev has said that development of the PAK DA will continue alongside resumption of production of the older model bomber.[20] Design[edit] Cockpit view of a Tu-160 The Tu-160 is a variable-geometry wing aircraft. The aircraft employs a fly-by-wire control system with a blended wing profile, and full-span slats are used on the leading edges, with double-slotted flaps on the trailing edges.[21] The Tu-160 has a crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, bombardier, and defensive systems operator) in K-36LM ejection seats.[22]
Views: 592918 ArmedForcesUpdate
MOST LARGEST AIRCRAFT of the US Air Force C-5 Galaxy Military Transport Aircraft
 
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Have a lookinside the most largest aircraft of the US Air Force the C-5 Galaxy Military transport aircraft. SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. - People attending the 2010 Airpower Over the Midwest Airshow Sept. 11-12 were able to catch a glimpse of a C-5M Super Galaxy from Dover Air Force Base, Del. The C-5M Super Galaxy has the latest upgrades in communications, navigation, surveillance and air traffic management, autopilot and safety equipment for the C-5 airframe, Air Mobility Command officials note. AMC began an aggressive program to modernize all remaining C-5Bs and C-5Cs and many of the C-5As in its inventory. The C-5 Avionics Modernization Program began in 1998 and included upgraded avionics, improved communications, new flat panel displays, improved navigation and safety equipment, and a new autopilot system. The first flight of the first AMP-modified C-5 (tail number 85-0004) occurred on Dec. 21, 2002. Another part of the C-5 modernization plan is the Reliability Enhancement and Re-engining Program, which includes new General Electric CF6-80C2 engines, pylons and auxiliary power units, with upgrades to the aircraft skin and frame, landing gear, cockpit and pressurization system. The C-5 aircraft that undergo both the AMP and RERP upgrades are designated C-5M, also known as the "Super Galaxy." The Air Force plans to upgrade 52 Galaxies to "super" status by the end of 2016. Each of the C-5M's CF6 engines produces 50,000 foot-pounds of thrust; up from the 43,000 pounds generated by the older General Electric TF-39 engines. The 22 percent increase in thrust results in a 30 percent shorter take-off roll, a 38 percent higher climb rate to initial altitude, a significantly increased cargo load, and a longer range between refueling. To put this into perspective, a C-5M with 50,000 pounds of fuel only needs 1,500 feet of runway to get airborne, while the legacy C-5s need between 3,000 to 4,000 feet. Additionally, a C-5M, at an average Takeoff Gross Weight above 600,000 lbs, can climb to cruising altitude of 34,000 feet in 18 minutes while legacy C-5s need 33 minutes to reach 25,000 feet. The faster climb saves fuel since less is needed at its cruising altitude. The AMP and RERP modernization programs are expected to raise the Mission Capable Rate to a minimum wartime goal of 75 percent, at an average procurement unit cost of $119 million per plane, which includes the aircraft and logistics support. And the warfighter isn't the only one who benefits from Super Galaxy; the Air Force estimates the C-5M will save taxpayers in excess of $17 billion over the next 40 years. As for the airshow, more than 180,000 people attended during both days and tens of thousands of visitors stopped to see the C-5M on display. (Mark Diamond, Air Mobility Command Public Affairs, contributed to this story.) Video Description Credits: Master Sgt. Scott Sturkol and Mark Diamond Video Credit: Jimmy D. Shea Video Thumbnail Credit: Tech. Sgt. Justin D. Pyle Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
Views: 113764 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS LARGEST US Military TOP SECRET Military Bunker for NORAD Mini Documentary
 
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PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. – Air Force Gen. Lori Robinson assumed command of the North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command from Navy Adm. Bill Gortney during a ceremony here today. The change of command ceremony was presided over by the U.S. Secretary of Defense, Ash Carter, and the Canadian Chief of the Defence Staff, Gen. Jonathan H. Vance. Also in attendance were the Canadian Minister of National Defence, The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan; and the U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph Dunford, Jr. NORAD is a bi-national command between the U.S. and Canada, while USNORTHCOM is the U.S. only geographic command for North America. The two commands have complementary missions and are co-located together in the headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colo. Carter praised Gortney for his service, leadership and professionalism, and welcomed Robinson to her new post. “As commander of NORAD and USNORTHCOM, Admiral Bill Gortney has been instrumental in forging a stronger coordination and deeper connection with both our Mexican and Canadian neighbors,” Carter said. “Bill, as you transition from this command, you can take comfort in knowing that NORAD and USNORTHCOM are now in the hands of another proven strategic leader, warrior and diplomat, General Lori Robinson.” The secretary noted that changes in the world continue to show the need for NORAD and USNORTHCOM to protect and defend North America. “As a strategic thinker and joint force leader, General Robinson has proven her ability to manage complex operations with partners across theaters and domains; these abilities will serve our nation well as NORAD and USNORTHCOM continue their vital contributions in the counter-ISIL campaign and defense of our homelands.” Sajjan remarked on the great partnership between Canada and the U.S. “NORAD is certainly a shining example of two countries that can and continue to work together for mutual benefit,” the Minister said. “May history record, reflect and remember our unique partnership.” As the new commander of two of the most complex commands in the world, Robinson spoke about the importance of homeland defense. “The world is more dangerous, and North America is increasingly vulnerable to a vast array of evolving threats, threats in every domain we operate in,” she said. Robinson also noted the importance of the various mission partners who are key to the success of the two commands. “With linkages in our cultures, our prosperity and our security, the quality and scope of cooperation between the United States, Canada and Mexico is at an unprecedented high,” she said. “Undeniably the power and the strength of NORAD and U.S. Northern Command are derived from its sustained partnerships with joint, interagency and multinational organizations.” Prior to departing from Colorado Springs, Colo., for retirement, Gortney took a moment to thank his family, the Navy and the local community for their support, and wished Robinson well in her new assignment. He had special words for his NORAD and NORTHCOM team. “To all the members of NORAD and NORTHCOM, Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines Coast Guardsmen, civilians, shipmates: I wish to thank each and every member of the NORAD and NORTHCOM team, and I want to really thank their families for the sacrifices and contributions each of them make. While we wear the cloth of our nation, it is the families that are the very stitching that hold that cloth together.” Video Description Credit: Stacey Knott Video Credit: U.S. Air Force Video shot by Andrew Arthur Breese Video Thumbnail Credit: US Air Force Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
Views: 36484 ArmedForcesUpdate
Swedish Military SUPER TOUGH bullet proof Armour great idea for hollywood celebrity security
 
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Swedish military univels a new type to bullet proof arour that whould be a great idea for improving celebrity security in hollywood. Saab’s Soft Armour system offers protection against ballistic penetration up to NATO 7.62 mm AP ammunition. It is a box concept designed to enhance survivability and can be fitted to any structure prior to missions, or even retrofitted to existing structures in operational theatre. KEY FEATURES Soft Armour is a patented ballistic protection technology that provides security for people in vulnerable environments. Soft Armour protects against all small arms ammunition including armour piercing. Military and special operations forces overseas are vulnerable and face many different challenges. To achieve mission success, protection of people and equipment are of vital importance. Saab offers just that – protection against ballistic penetration, counter barrier systems and portable shelters that provide defence against AP ammunition, RPG and vehicle attacks plus protection from heat build-up for vehicles, ammunition and personnel. SOFT ARMOUR Saab’s Soft Armour system offers protection against ballistic penetration up to NATO 7.62 mm AP ammunition (STANAG level III). The system is a box concept filled with hard ceramic balls. The system is especially designed to enhance survivability and can be fitted to any structure prior to missions, or even retrofitted to existing structures in operational theatre. A unique ceramic material protects against ballistic penetration. Soft Armour is a patented ballistic protection technology that provides security for people in vulnerable environments. Soft Armour also protects critical equipment and facilities. Soft Armour protects against all small arms ammunition including armour piercing. The system has a lower total cost than ceramic and composite protection, with reusability, multi-hit capabilities and high flexibility. Saab’s Soft Armour system offers protection against ballistic penetration up to NATO 7.62 mm AP ammunition (STANAG level III). The system is a box concept making it possible to fit to any vehicle or structure prior to mission, or even retrofit to existing structure in theatre. MODULAR The Modular Soft Armour protection system has several areas of use. It can be integrated with any type of structure and can be fitted onto existing structures or vehicles requiring additional protection. The system can also be used as a stand-alone. The modularity of the system is granted by using panels that are easily joined together with standard tools; ceramic filling is added after construction of the panel boxes. HIGH PERFORMANCE With a weight of 180 kg/m² and a thickness of 120 mm, the system protects against bursts of 7.62*51 AP ammunition (equivalent to STANAG level III). The Saab Modular Soft Armour also protects against most fragmentation on the battlefield. TRANSPORTATION The modularity of the system enables transport in different collies to optimise weight, space and bulk to existing transport capabilities. LIGHTWEIGHT The protection level of the Modular Soft Armour system ~180 kg/m² can be compared with concrete 500 kg/m² and RHA 200 kg/m². USE Built into new military or civilian infrastructure. Add on as a Lego system for protection of existing infrastructure. Rapidly deployed protection for Roadblocks/Safe houses. VIP protection Possible to retrofit The Swedish Armed Forces (Swedish: Försvarsmakten) is a Swedish Government Agency responsible for the maintenance and operation of the armed forces of Sweden. The primary task of the Swedish Armed Forces is to train, organize and deploy military forces, domestically and abroad, while maintaining the long-term ability to defend the country in the event of war. The Armed Forces consists of three service branches; the Army, the Air Force and the Navy. Since 1994, the three service branches are organized within a single unified government agency, headed by the Supreme Commander. However, the services maintain their separate identities through the use of different uniforms, ranks, and other service specific traditions. Sweden's military forces were for over a century built upon the concepts of conscription and territorial defence, supporting the longstanding national policy of non-alignment. Until the end of the Cold War nearly all men reaching the age of military service were conscripted. In 2010, peacetime conscription was abolished, to be replaced with an all-volunteer force. The transfer to the new system is planned to be fully completed in 2018. Units from the Swedish Armed Forces are currently on deployment in Afghanistan (as part of ISAF) and in Kosovo. Moreover, Sweden contributes military observers to various countries and serve as the lead nation for an EU Battle Group approximately once every three years. Doctrine[edit] Main article: Foreign relations of Sweden The Swedish Armed Forces have four main tasks:[3]
Views: 131747 ArmedForcesUpdate
F-16 takes off WITHOUT PILOT us air force unmanned target aircraft
 
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A great video of the US air force F-16 taking off with out its pilot. The General Dynamics (now Lockheed Martin) F-16 Fighting Falcon is a single-engine multirole fighter aircraft originally developed by General Dynamics for the United States Air Force (USAF). Designed as an air superiority day fighter, it evolved into a successful all-weather multirole aircraft. Over 4,500 aircraft have been built since production was approved in 1976.[3] Although no longer being purchased by the U.S. Air Force, improved versions are still being built for export customers. In 1993, General Dynamics sold its aircraft manufacturing business to the Lockheed Corporation,[4] which in turn became part of Lockheed Martin after a 1995 merger with Martin Marietta.[5] The Fighting Falcon has key features including a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, side-mounted control stick to ease control while maneuvering, a seat reclined 30 degrees to reduce the effect of g-forces on the pilot, and the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire flight control system helps to make it a nimble aircraft. The F-16 has an internal M61 Vulcan cannon and 11 locations for mounting weapons and other mission equipment. The F-16's official name is "Fighting Falcon", but "Viper" is commonly used by its pilots, due to a perceived resemblance to a viper snake as well as the Battlestar Galactica Colonial Viper starfighter.[6][7] In addition to active duty U.S. Air Force, Air Force Reserve Command, and Air National Guard units, the aircraft is also used by the USAF aerial demonstration team, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, and as an adversary/aggressor aircraft by the United States Navy. The F-16 has also been procured to serve in the air forces of 25 other nations.[8] Role Multirole fighter aircraft National origin United States Manufacturer General Dynamics Lockheed Martin Aeronautics First flight 20 January 1974 Introduction 17 August 1978 Status In service Primary users United States Air Force 25 other users (see operators page) Produced 1973–present Number built 4,540+[1] Unit cost F-16A/B: US$14.6 million (1998 dollars)[2] F-16C/D: US$18.8 million (1998 dollars)[2] Variants General Dynamics F-16 VISTA Developed into Vought Model 1600 General Dynamics F-16XL Mitsubishi F-2 Design Overview The F-16 is a single-engine, very maneuverable, supersonic, multi-role tactical fighter aircraft; it was designed to be a cost-effective combat "workhorse" that can perform various missions and maintain around-the-clock readiness. It is much smaller and lighter than predecessors, but uses advanced aerodynamics and avionics, including the first use of a relaxed static stability/fly-by-wire (RSS/FBW) flight control system, to achieve enhanced maneuver performance. Highly nimble, the F-16 was the first fighter aircraft purpose-built to pull 9-g maneuvers and can reach a maximum speed of over Mach 2. Innovations include a frameless bubble canopy for better visibility, side-mounted control stick, and reclined seat to reduce g-force effects on the pilot. It is armed with an internal M61 Vulcan cannon in the left wing root and has multiple locations for mounting various missiles, bombs and pods. It has a thrust-to-weight ratio greater than one, providing power to climb and accelerate vertically.[2] The F-16 was designed to be relatively inexpensive to build and simpler to maintain than earlier-generation fighters. The airframe is built with about 80% aviation-grade aluminum alloys, 8% steel, 3% composites, and 1.5% titanium. The leading-edge flaps, stabilators, and ventral fins make use of bonded aluminum honeycomb structures and graphite epoxy laminate coatings. The number of lubrication points, fuel line connections, and replaceable modules is significantly lower than predecessors; 80% of access panels can be accessed without stands.[38] The air intake was placed so it was rearward of the nose but forward enough to minimize air flow losses and reduce drag.[58] Although the LWF program called for a structural life of 4,000 flight hours, capable of achieving 7.33 g with 80% internal fuel; GD's engineers decided to design the F-16's airframe life for 8,000 hours and for 9-g maneuvers on full internal fuel. This proved advantageous when the aircraft's mission changed from solely air-to-air combat to multi-role operations. Changes in operational use and additional systems have increased weight, necessitating multiple structural strengthening programs.[59] General configuration The F-16 has a cropped-delta planform incorporating wing-fuselage blending and forebody vortex-control strakes; a fixed-geometry, underslung air intake to the single turbofan jet engine; a conventional tri-plane empennage arrangement with all-moving horizontal "stabilator" tailplanes; a pair of ventral fins beneath the fuselage aft of the wing's trailing edge; and a tricycle landing gear configuration with the aft-retracting,
Views: 70781 ArmedForcesUpdate
French Air Force MOST FEARED fighter aircraft Rafale
 
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The French air force shows it's air power in an airshow over paris. The French Air Force (French: Armée de l'air [aʀme də lɛʀ], "army of the air") is the air force of the French Armed Forces. It was formed in 1909 as the Service Aéronautique, a service arm of the French Army, then was made an independent military arm in 1934. The number of aircraft in service with the French Air Force varies depending on source, however sources from the French Ministry of Defence give a figure of 658 aircraft in 2014.[5][6] The French Air Force has 219 combat aircraft in service, with the majority being 124 Dassault Mirage 2000 and 95 Dassault Rafale. As of early 2014, the French Air Force employs a total of 45,489 regular personnel. The reserve element of the air force consisted of 4,356 personnel of the Operational Reserve.[1] The Minister of Defence is responsible for execution of military policy. He is advised by the Chief of Staff of the Armies (CEMA) in regard to the use of forces and the control of military operations. The Chief of Staff of the French Air Force (CEMAA) determines the air force doctrines and advises the CEMA how to deploy French air assets. He is responsible for the preparation and logistic support of the air force. History Main articles: History of the Armée de l'Air (1909–1942), Free French Air Force, Vichy French Air Force and History of the Armée de l'Air (colonial presence 1939–1962) The French took active interest in developing the air force from 1909 and had the first World War I fighter pilots. During the interwar years, however, particularly in the 1930s, the quality fell after they compared with the Luftwaffe, which crushed the French during the Battle of France. In the post–World War II era, the French made a successful effort to develop a domestic aircraft industry. Dassault Aviation led the way mainly with delta-wing designs, which formed the basis for the Mirage series of jet fighters. The Mirage demonstrated its abilities in the Six-Day War, Yom Kippur War, the Falklands War and the Gulf War, becoming one of the most popular jet fighters of its day, with a high quantity of sales. The French Air Force participated in several protracted colonial wars in Africa and Indochina after the Second World War, and continues to employ its air power in Africa. From January 1964, the French political leadership, now prioritising nuclear deterrence, put in train a complete reorganisation of the Air Force, with the creation of four air régions and seven major specialised commands, among which was the Strategic Air Forces Command (Commandement des forces aérienne stratégiques) (CoFAS).[7] The Military Air Transport Command had previously been formed in February 1962 from the Groupement d'Unités Aériennes Spécialisées. The Dassault Mirage IV, the principal French strategic bomber, was designed to strike Soviet positions as part of the French nuclear triad. Also created in 1964 was the Escadron des Fusiliers Commandos de l'Air (EFCA), seemingly grouping all FCA units. In 1985, the Air Force had four major flying commands, the Strategic Air Forces Command, the Tactical Air Forces Command, the Military Air Transport Command, and the Commandement Air des Forces de Défense Aérienne (Air Command of Air Defence Forces).[8] CFAS had two squadrons of S-3 IRBMs at the Plateau d'Albion, six squadrons of Mirage IVAs (at Mont de Marsan, Cazaux, Orange, Istres, St Dizier, and EB 3/94 at Luxeuil), and three squadrons of KC-135Fs, as well as a training/reconnaissance unit, CIFAS 328, at Bordeaux. The tactical air command included wings EC 3, EC 4, EC 7, EC 11, EC 13, and ER 33, with a total of 19 squadrons of Mirage III, Jaguars, two squadrons flying the Mirage 5F (EC 2/13 and EC 3/13, both at Colmar), and a squadron flying the Mirage F.1CR. CoTAM counted 28 squadrons, of which ten were fixed-wing transport squadrons, and the remainder helicopter and liaison squadrons, at least five of which were overseas. CAFDA numbered 14 squadrons mostly flying the Mirage F.1C. Two other commands had flying units, the Air Force Schools Command (CEAA), and the Air Force Transmissions Command, with four squadrons and three trials units. In 1994 the Commandement des Fusiliers Commandos de l'Air was established. Currently, the French Air Force is expanding and replacing aircraft inventory. The French are awaiting the A400M military transport aircraft, which is still in developmental stages, and the integration of the new Dassault Rafale multi-role jet fighter, whose first squadron of 20 aircraft became operational in 2006 at Saint-Dizier. After an absence lasting several decades, the French President Nicolas Sarkozy confirmed that France will rejoin the NATO integrated command.[9] France has also been a lead nation, alongside the United States, Great Britain and Italy in implementing the UN sponsored no-fly zone in Libya (NATO 'Odyessy Dawn'),
Views: 252675 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Air force puts on a SHOW OF FORCE in military exercise
 
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The united states air force puts on another great air show in a recent military exercise. The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven American uniformed services. Initially part of the United States Army, the USAF was formed as a separate branch of the military on 18 September 1947 under the National Security Act of 1947.[5] It is the most recent branch of the U.S. military to be formed, and is the largest and one of the world's most technologically advanced air forces. The USAF articulates its core functions as Nuclear Deterrence Operations, Special Operations, Air Superiority, Global Integrated ISR, Space Superiority, Command and Control, Cyberspace Superiority, Personnel Recovery, Global Precision Attack, Building Partnerships, Rapid Global Mobility and Agile Combat Support.[6] The U.S. Air Force is a military service within the Department of the Air Force, one of the three military departments of the Department of Defense. The USAF is headed by the civilian Secretary of the Air Force, who is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The highest-ranking military officer in the Department of the Air Force is the Chief of Staff of the Air Force who exercises supervision over Air Force units, and serves as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force combat forces and mobility forces are assigned, as directed by the Secretary of Defense, to the Combatant Commanders, and neither the Secretary of the Air Force nor the Chief of Staff have operational command authority over them. The U.S. Air Force provides air support for surface forces[7] and aids in the recovery of troops in the field. As of 2012, the service operates more than 5,638 aircraft, 450 ICBMs and 63 satellites. It has a $140 billion budget with 332,854 active duty personnel, 185,522 civilian personnel, 71,400 Air Force Reserve personnel, and 106,700 Air National Guard personnel.[2] Mission, vision, and functions[edit] Missions[edit] According to the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 502), which created the USAF: In general the United States Air Force shall include aviation forces both combat and service not otherwise assigned. It shall be organized, trained, and equipped primarily for prompt and sustained offensive and defensive air operations. The Air Force shall be responsible for the preparation of the air forces necessary for the effective prosecution of war except as otherwise assigned and, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the expansion of the peacetime components of the Air Force to meet the needs of war. §8062 of Title 10 US Code defines the purpose of the USAF as:[8] to preserve the peace and security, and provide for the defense, of the United States, the Territories, Commonwealths, and possessions, and any areas occupied by the United States; to support national policy; to implement national objectives; to overcome any nations responsible for aggressive acts that imperil the peace and security of the United States. The stated mission of the USAF today is to "fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace".[9] Vision[edit] "The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our sister services known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the joint mission first and foremost. We will provide compelling air, space, and cyber capabilities for use by the combatant commanders. We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the American people, while providing precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the nation".[9] Core functions[edit] Recently, the Air Force refined its understanding of the core duties and responsibilities it performs as a Military Service Branch, streamlining what previously were six distinctive capabilities and seventeen operational functions into twelve core functions to be used across the doctrine, organization, training, equipment, leadership, and education, personnel, and facilities spectrum. These core functions express the ways in which the Air Force is particularly and appropriately suited to contribute to national security, but they do not necessarily express every aspect of what the Air Force contributes to the nation. It should be emphasized that the core functions, by themselves, are not doctrinal constructs.[10] Air Superiority Air Superiority is "that degree of dominance in the air battle of one force over another which permits the conduct of operations by the former and its related land, sea, air, and special operations forces at a given time and place without prohibitive interference by the opposing force" (JP 1-02).[10] First F-35 Lightning II of the 33rd Fighter Wing arrives at Eglin AFB Offensive Counterair (OCA) is defined as "offensive operations to destroy, disrupt, or neutralize enemy aircraft, missiles,
Views: 2369000 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Military ELITE SPECIAL OPERATIONS  units promo video
 
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A great promotional video of the US Navy elite special operations units. The U.S. Navy's special warfare combatant-craft crewmen (SWCC, pronounced "Swick") is a Special Operations Force that operates and maintains an inventory of small craft used to support special operations missions, particularly those of the U.S. Navy SEALs.[1] Individually, SEALs and SWCC go through separate specialized training programs that emphasize special operations in the maritime environment. SWCC are trained extensively in craft and weapons tactics, techniques, and procedures. Focusing on clandestine infiltration and exfiltration of SEALs and other special operations forces, SWCC provide dedicated, rapid mobility in shallow water areas where large ships cannot operate. SWCC must be physically fit, highly motivated, combat-focused, and responsive in high-stress situations. History[edit] A fast patrol craft on Cai Ngay canal during the Vietnam War in 1970 Special boat teams can trace their history back to World War II. Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three rescued General Douglas MacArthur (and later the Filipino president) from the Philippines after the Japanese invasion and then participated in guerilla actions until American resistance ended with the fall of Corregidor. PT boats subsequently participated in most of the campaigns in the Southwest Pacific by conducting and supporting joint/combined reconnaissance, blockade, sabotage, and raiding missions as well as attacking Japanese shore facilities, shipping, and combatants. PT boats were used in the European Theater beginning in April 1944 to support the Office of Strategic Services in the insertion of espionage and French Resistance personnel and for amphibious landing deception. While there is no direct line between organizations, United States Naval Special Warfare Command embracement is predicated on the similarity in craft and mission.[clarification needed] The development of a robust riverine warfare capability during the Vietnam War produced the forerunner of the modern special warfare combatant-craft crewman. Mobile support teams provided combat craft support for SEAL operations, as did patrol boat, river (PBR) and patrol craft, fast (PCF) sailors. In February 1964, Boat Support Unit One was established under Naval Operations Support Group, Pacific to operate the newly reinstated patrol torpedo fast (PTF) program and to operate high-speed craft in support of NSW forces. In late 1964 the first PTFs arrived in Da Nang, Vietnam. In 1965, Boat Support Squadron One began training patrol craft fast crews for Vietnamese coastal patrol and interdiction operations. As the Vietnam mission expanded into the riverine environment, additional craft, tactics, and training evolved for riverine patrol and SEAL support.[2] SWCC in the special operations craft, riverine SWCC detachments have participated in nearly every major conflict since then, particularly in the Persian Gulf theatre during the 1987–1988 period of conflict and the 1991 Gulf War to the more recent War on Terrorism. In August 1996 while attached to USS Sides during counter drug operations in Colombia, Special Boat Squadron 1 (SBS1) came under attack in the Antioquia Valley region by members of FARC, Colombia's revolutionary movement, while conducting field operations. Six SBS1 members held off a force of approximately 150 rebels. The battle lasted for three days and nights and members of SBS1 found themselves surrounded and cut off from each other on several occasions. Short of ammunition and water, SBS1 held on until first light on day three, regrouped and counter-attacked, punching a hole in the FARC defense line and linking up with Colombian special forces sent there to assist them. An estimated 43 FARC rebels were killed during the battle and four were captured with only one team member being wounded. Members of the team were cited for their heroism and bravery. Special warfare boat operator (SB) rating[edit] The Global War on Terrorism was the impetus for several important changes in the NSW community. One of these many changes was the creation of a new SB rating system for SWCCs, which allows them to focus on their unique skill sets, to avoid limitations and constraints imposed by the old regime of "source ratings", to reach consensus and unity within the profession, and to allow them to enjoy advancement opportunities on par with the rest of the Navy. Special warfare combatant-craft crewman warfare specialty[edit] Another important development was the recognition of the knowledge, skills, and training of SWCC crewmen as a warfare specialty, represented by the NEC 5352 and later denoted by the award of a military device or service badge. For a brief period qualified sailors were awarded no device; boat captain-qualified sailors wore the small craft insignia originally
Views: 178511 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS FASTEST AIRCRAFT in service today Russian Mig 31 Foxhound
 
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The Mikoyan MiG-31 (Russian: Микоян МиГ-31; NATO reporting name: Foxhound) is a supersonic interceptor aircraft developed to replace the MiG-25 "Foxbat". The MiG-31 was designed by the Mikoyan design bureau based on the MiG-25.[2] Like the MiG-25, MiG-31 is a large twin-engine aircraft with side-mounted air intakes, a shoulder-mounted wing with an aspect ratio of 2.94, and twin vertical tailfins. Unlike the MiG-25, it has two seats, with the rear occupied by a dedicated weapon systems officer.[citation needed] The wings and airframe of the MiG-31 are stronger than those of the MiG-25, permitting supersonic flight at low altitudes. Its D30-F6 jet engine, rated at 152 kN thrust, allow a maximum speed of Mach 1.23 at low altitude. High-altitude speed is temperature-redlined to Mach 2.83—the thrust-to-drag ratio is sufficient for speeds in excess of Mach 3, but such speeds pose unacceptable hazards to engine and airframe life in routine use.[3] MiG-31 is limited to only 5 g at supersonic speeds.[3] At combat weight, its wing loading is marginal and its thrust to weight ratio is favorable. However, it is not designed for close combat or rapid turning.[3] The MiG-31 was the world's first operational fighter with a passive electronically scanned array radar (PESA), the Zaslon S-800. Its maximum range against fighter-sized targets is approximately 200 km (125 mi), and it can track up to 10 targets and simultaneously attack four of them with its Vympel R-33 missiles. It is claimed to have limited astern coverage, possibly due to drag chute housing above and between the engines. The radar is matched with an infrared search and tracking (IRST) system in a retractable undernose fairing.[3] Adopted in 1981 the range detection of air targets: 200 km (for the purpose of with the radar cross-section of 19 m² on a collision angles with probability 0.5) target detection distance with radar cross-section of 3 m² in the rear within 35 km with a probability of 0.5 ([11][12]) number of detected targets: 24 the number of targets for attack: 8 the range of automatic tracking: 120 km detection of thermal goals - 56 km The basic differences between versions МиГ-31БМ:[13] The onboard radar complex MiG-31БМ is capable of simultaneously detecting 24 air targets, 8 of which can be simultaneously attacked by missiles R-33S. Achieved a possibility to intercept targets flying at a speed corresponding to M=6, improved other characteristics of the complex.[citation needed] Modernized variants of the aircraft can be equipped with radar missiles Kh-31S, Kh-25MP or Kh-25МПУ (up to six units), anti-ship UR Kh-31A (up to six), class missiles air-to-surface Kh-29 and Kh-59 (up to three) or X-59M (up to two units), up to six corrected air bombs KAB-1500 or eight KAB-500 with television or laser-guided. Maximum mass of payload is to 9000 kg.[citation needed] The MiG-31M-, MiG-31D-, and MiG-31BS-standard aircraft have an upgraded Zaslon-M radar, with larger antenna and greater detection range (said to be 400 km (250 mi) against AWACS-size targets) and the ability to attack multiple targets — air and ground — simultaneously. The Zaslon-M has a 1.4m diameter (larger) antenna, 50% to 100% better performance than Zaslon. In April 1994 it was used with an R-37 to hit a target at 300 km distance.[citation needed] It has a search range 400 km versus a 19/20 sq m RCS target and can track 24 targets at once, engaging six[14][15](282 km for 5m2[16]). The aircraft is a two-seater with the rear seat occupant controlling the radar. Although cockpit controls are duplicated across cockpits, it is normal for the aircraft to be flown only from the front seat. The pilot flies the aircraft by means of a centre stick and left hand throttles. The rear cockpit has only two small vision ports on the sides of the canopy. It is argued that the presence of the WSO (Weapon Systems Operator) in the rear cockpit improves aircraft effectiveness since the WSO is entirely dedicated to radar operations and weapons deployment. This decreases the workload of the pilot and increases efficiency. Both cockpits are fitted with zero/zero ejection seats which allow the crew to eject at any altitude and airspeed.[3] It has been claimed by Russian Federation Defence Ministry chief Colonel Yuri Balyko, that the upgrade will increase the combat effectiveness of the aircraft several times over.[17] The MiG-31's main armament is four R-33 air-to-air missiles (NATO codename AA-9 'Amos') carried under the belly. The R-33 is the Russian equivalent of the U.S. Navy's AIM-54 Phoenix. Unlike the MiG-25, the MiG-31 has an internal cannon, a six-barrel, 23 mm GSh-6-23 with 800 rounds of ammunition, mounted above the starboard main landing gear bay. The GSh-6-23 has a claimed rate of fire of over 10,000 rounds per minute. However, after two Su-24 were lost because of premature shell detonation in 1983, plus some different problems with gun usage (system failures, etc.),
Views: 640244 ArmedForcesUpdate
Swedish Military NEW ADVANCED camouflage for Leopard 2 Main Battle Tank
 
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A great idea for the Swedish military and all NATO German made Leopard 2 Main Battle Tanks this new camouflage will make a big difference on the battle field of tomorrow. Multi-spectral camouflage is the use of counter-surveillance techniques to conceal objects from detection across several parts of the electromagnetic spectrum at the same time. While traditional military camouflage attempts to hide an object in the visible spectrum, multi-spectral camouflage also tries to simultaneously hide objects from detection methods such as infrared, radar, and millimetre-wave radar imaging.[1][2] Among animals, both insects such as the eyed hawk-moth, and vertebrates such as tree frogs possess camouflage that works in the infra-red as well as in the visible spectrum. History The English zoologist Hugh Cott, in his 1940 book Adaptive Coloration in Animals, wrote that some caterpillars such as the eyed hawk-moth Smerinthus ocellatus, and tree frogs such as the red-snouted treefrog Hyla coerulea, are coloured so as to blend with their backgrounds whether observed in visible light or in infra-red.[3][4] Cott noted the importance of camouflage in the infra-red, given the ability of tactical reconnaissance to observe in this part of the spectrum: Because such screens are effective against direct observation and ordinary photography, by no means does it follow that they will be hidden in the infra-red photograph. Comparison of aerial photographs taken simultaneously on panchromatic and infra-red plates will reveal much that before the advent of this new technique would have been adequately camouflaged... —Hugh Cott, 1940.[5] A German-led NATO research project concluded in 2004 that while "the multispectral signatures of most military equipment can be significantly reduced by combinations of various camouflage materials", multi-spectral camouflage for individual soldiers remained lacking. The main problems identified were operational constraints such as mobility, weight, and the soldier's physiology.[6] Camouflage[edit] Multi-spectral camouflage can be applied to individuals in the form of a ghillie suit, disguising the heat given off by the wearer's body, and to vehicles and buildings with either specialised paints or camouflage nets that reduce the amount of heat given off by an object, as well as altering the shape and size of its radar signature.[7][8][9][10][11] The SAAB Barracuda Mobile Camouflage System provides a degree of concealment in the visible, thermal infrared, and radar parts of the electromagnetic spectrum,[12] as does the Miranda Berberys-R multispectral camouflage system from Poland.[13] The Swedish Armed Forces (Swedish: Försvarsmakten) form the military forces of Sweden, tasked with defence of the country, as well as promoting Sweden's wider interests, supporting international peacekeeping efforts, and providing humanitarian aid. It consists of: the Swedish Army, the Swedish Air Force and the Swedish Navy, with addition of a military reserve force, the Home Guard (Swedish: Hemvärnet). Since 1994, the first three service branches are organised within a unified government agency, headed by the Supreme Commander, while the Home Guard reports directly to the Supreme Commander. King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden is traditionally attributed as Honorary Commander-in-Chief à la suite.[4] The military history of Sweden includes several unions and wars with all of its neighbour states, including extended Swedish intervention in the Thirty Years' War at the times of the Swedish Empire during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Wars with Russia culminated in the Finnish War (1808-1809), with Sweden permanently losing Finland. During the World Wars, the Cold War and throughout the 20th century, Sweden maintained a national policy of non-alignment, while the Swedish Armed Forces strength was based upon the concepts of conscription. In 2010, peacetime conscription was abolished, replacing it with volunteer armed forces including the Home Guard – National Security Force until 2018. Units from the Swedish Armed Forces are currently on deployment in several international operations either actively or as military observers, including Afghanistan as part of ISAF and in Kosovo. Moreover, Swedish Armed Forces contribute as the lead nation for an EU Battle Group approximately once every three years. History[edit] Main article: Military history of Sweden The military history of Sweden includes several unions and wars with all of its neighbour states, including extended Swedish intervention in the Thirty Years' War at the times of the Swedish Empire during the 17th and early 18th centuries. Wars with Russia culminated in the Finnish War (1808-1809), with Sweden permanently losing Finland. During the World Wars, the Cold War and throughout the 20th century, Sweden maintained a national policy of non-alignment, while the Swedish Armed Forces strength was based upon the concepts of conscription.
Views: 651771 ArmedForcesUpdate
ONE OF A KIND US Military V 22 Osprey Tiltrotor Aircraft
 
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The United States Armed Forces[N 1] are the military forces of the United States of America. They consist of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard.[6] The U.S. has a strong tradition of civilian control of the military. The President of the United States is the military's overall head, and helps form military policy with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), a federal executive department, acting as the principal organ by which military policy is carried out. The DoD is headed by the Secretary of Defense, who is a civilian and Cabinet member. The Defense Secretary is second in the military's chain of command, just below the President, and serves as the principal assistant to the President in all DoD-related matters.[7] To coordinate military action with diplomacy, the President has an advisory National Security Council headed by a National Security Advisor. Both the President and Secretary of Defense are advised by a seven-member Joint Chiefs of Staff, which includes the head of each of the Defense Department's service branches as well as the chief of the National Guard Bureau. Leadership is provided by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.[8] The Commandant of the Coast Guard is not a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is an American multi-mission, military, tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability. It is designed to combine the functionality of a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. The V-22 originated from the United States Department of Defense Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft program started in 1981. The team of Bell Helicopter and Boeing Helicopters was awarded a development contract in 1983 for the tiltrotor aircraft. The Bell Boeing team jointly produce the aircraft.[4] The V-22 first flew in 1989, and began flight testing and design alterations; the complexity and difficulties of being the first tiltrotor intended for military service in the world led to many years of development. The United States Marine Corps began crew training for the Osprey in 2000, and fielded it in 2007; it is supplementing and will eventually replace their CH-46 Sea Knights. The Osprey's other operator, the U.S. Air Force, fielded their version of the tiltrotor in 2009. Since entering service with the U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force, the Osprey has been deployed in both combat and rescue operations over Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. The Osprey is the world's first production tiltrotor aircraft, with one three-bladed proprotor, turboprop engine, and transmission nacelle mounted on each wingtip. It is classified as a powered lift aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration.[88] For takeoff and landing, it typically operates as a helicopter with the nacelles vertical and rotors horizontal. Once airborne, the nacelles rotate forward 90° in as little as 12 seconds for horizontal flight, converting the V-22 to a more fuel efficient, higher speed turboprop aircraft. STOL rolling-takeoff and landing capability is achieved by having the nacelles tilted forward up to 45°.[68] Other orientations are possible, such as the "80 Jump" takeoff which uses nacelles at 80° to quickly achieve high altitude and speed.[89] Composite materials make up 43% of the V-22's airframe. The proprotors blades also use composites.[68] For compact storage and transport, partly on Marine launch ships, the V-22's rotors fold in 90 seconds and its wing rotates to align, front-to-back, with the fuselage.[90] Due to the requirement of folding the rotors their 38 feet diameter is 5 feet less than optimal for vertical takeoff, resulting in high disk loading.[89] Most Osprey missions use fixed wing flight 75 percent or more of the time, reducing wear and tear on the aircraft and reducing operational costs. This fixed wing flight is higher than typical helicopter missions allowing longer range line-of-sight communications for improved command and control.[24] The V-22's two Rolls-Royce AE 1107C engines are connected by drive shafts to a common central gearbox so that one engine can power both proprotors if an engine failure occurs.[53] However, if a proprotor gearbox fails that proprotor cannot be feathered, and both engines must be stopped before an emergency landing.[52] The aircraft's autorotation characteristics are poor partly because the rotors have low inertia.[52] Boeing has stated the V-22 design loses 10% of its vertical lift over a Tiltwing design when operating in helicopter mode because of airflow resistance due to the wings, but that the Tiltrotor design has better short takeoff and landing performance.[91] The rotorwash usually prevents usage of the starboard door in hover, and the rear ramp is used for rappelling and hoisting.[52]
Views: 4249463 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Military WORLDS LARGEST m1 Abrams Tank Stockpile
 
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A great video about the worlds largest M1 Abrams Tank graveyard. The United States Armed Forces[1] are the federal military forces of the United States. They consist of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard.[7] The United States has a strong tradition of civilian control of the military. The President of the United States is the military's overall head, and helps form military policy with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), a federal executive department, acting as the principal organ by which military policy is carried out. The DoD is headed by the Secretary of Defense, who is a civilian and Cabinet member. The Defense Secretary is second in the military's chain of command, just below the President, and serves as the principal assistant to the President in all DoD-related matters.[8] To coordinate military action with diplomacy, the President has an advisory National Security Council headed by a National Security Advisor. Both the President and Secretary of Defense are advised by a seven-member Joint Chiefs of Staff, which includes the head of each of the Defense Department's service branches as well as the chief of the National Guard Bureau. Leadership is provided by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.[9] The Commandant of the Coast Guard is not a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. All of the branches work together during operations and joint missions, under the Unified Combatant Commands, under the authority of the Secretary of Defense with the exception of the Coast Guard, which is under the administration of the Department of Homeland Security and receives its operational orders from the Secretary of Homeland Security. However, the Coast Guard may be transferred to the Department of the Navy by the President or Congress during a time of war.[10] All five armed services are among the seven uniformed services of the United States, the two others being the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (under the Department of Health and Human Services) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps (under the Department of Commerce). From the time of its inception, the military played a decisive role in the history of the United States. A sense of national unity and identity was forged as a result of victory in the First Barbary War and the Second Barbary War. Even so, the Founders were suspicious of a permanent military force and not until the outbreak of World War II did a large standing army become officially established. The National Security Act of 1947, adopted following World War II and during the Cold War's onset, created the modern U.S. military framework; the Act merged previously Cabinet-level Department of War and the Department of the Navy into the National Military Establishment (renamed the Department of Defense in 1949), headed by the Secretary of Defense; and created the Department of the Air Force and National Security Council. The U.S. military is one of the largest militaries in terms of number of personnel. It draws its manpower from a large pool of paid volunteers; although conscription has been used in the past in various times of both war and peace, it has not been used since 1972. As of 2013, the United States spends about $554.2 billion annually to fund its military forces, and appropriates approximately $88.5 billion to fund Overseas Contingency Operations.[5] Put together, the United States constitutes roughly 39 percent of the world's military expenditures. For the period 2010–14, SIPRI found that the United States was the world's biggest exporter of major arms, accounting for 31 per cent of global shares. The United States was also the world's eight largest importer of major weapons for the same period.[11] The U.S. Armed Forces has significant capabilities in both defense and power projection thanks to its advanced and powerful equipment and its widespread deployment of force around the world. History[edit] Main article: Military history of the United States The history of the U.S. military dates to 1775, even before the Declaration of Independence marked the establishment of the United States. The Continental Army, Continental Navy, and Continental Marines were created in close succession by the Second Continental Congress in order to defend the new nation against the British Empire in the American Revolutionary War. These forces demobilized in 1784 after the Treaty of Paris ended the War for Independence. The Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784, and the United States Congress created the United States Navy on March 27, 1794, and the United States Marine Corps on July 11, 1798. All three services trace their origins to the founding of the Continental Army (on 14 June 1775), the Continental Navy (on 13 October 1775) and the Continental Marines (on 10 November 1775), respectively.
Views: 5095531 ArmedForcesUpdate
IRAN MILITARY FLYS RQ-170 UAV AIRCRAFT COPY
 
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Iran has unveiled and flown its Lockheed Martin RQ-170 uav aircraft copy for the first time this RQ-170 may lead to interesting developments in the P5+1 nuclear talks. The footage of the Iranian version of a US drone which was brought down some three years ago and later reverse-engineered by Iranian experts has been released. Iran recently put into operation a final version of the sophisticated US RQ-170 stealth aircraft, which was downed with minimal damage by the Iranian Armed Forces’ electronic warfare unit in December, 2011, while flying over the Iranian city of Kashmar, some 225 kilometers (140 miles) from the Afghan border. The domestically produced version of the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) made a successful maiden flight a few days ago the footage of which has just been released. At the time when the American drone was captured, US military officials tried to play the incident down, saying Iran did not have the technology to decipher the data stored on the UAV. However, the aircraft was successfully reverse-engineered by IRGC experts in about two years. In May, the Islamic Republic unveiled a copy of the American UAV originally designed and developed by the Lockheed Martin Company. The drone is one of the United States’ most advanced spy aircraft and its loss is considered a major embarrassment for Washington. In recent years, Iran has made major breakthroughs in its defense sector and attained self-sufficiency in producing important military equipment and systems. NN/HRB On 4 December 2011, an American Lockheed Martin RQ-170 Sentinel unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was captured by Iranian forces near the city of Kashmar in northeastern Iran. The Iranian government announced that the UAV was brought down by its cyberwarfare unit which commandeered the aircraft and safely landed it, after initial reports from Western news sources inaccurately claimed that it had been "shot down".[1] The United States government initially denied the claims but later President Obama acknowledged that the downed aircraft was a US drone and requested Iran to return it.[2][3] Capture of the drone[edit] The government of Iran announced that the aircraft was brought down by its cyber warfare unit stationed near Kashmar[4][5][6][7] and "brought down with minimum damage"[8] They said the aircraft was detected in Iranian airspace 225 kilometers (140 mi) from the border with Afghanistan.[9] The government of the United States initially claimed that its forces in Afghanistan had lost control of a UAV on 4 December 2011 and that there was a possibility that this is the vehicle that crashed near Kashmar. According to unnamed U.S. officials, a U.S. UAV operated by the Central Intelligence Agency was flying on the Afghan side of the Afghanistan-Iran border when its operators lost control of the vehicle.[10][11] There have been reports that "foreign officials and American experts who have been briefed on the effort" state that the crashed UAV was taking part in routine surveillance of Iranian nuclear facilities inside Iranian airspace.[12] The drone appeared to be largely intact, except for possible minor visible damage on its left wing. Dan Goure, an analyst at the Lexington Institute, stated the largely intact airframe ruled out the possibility of an engine or navigational malfunction: "Either this was a cyber/electronic warfare attack system that brought the system down or it was a glitch in the command-and-control system."[13] At least one US source admitted that Iran could have interrupted the data-link and bring it to a soft landing.[14] Some US officials stated the drone broke into three pieces during impact. They claimed that it was reassembled for display purposes and was painted by Iran to hide the damage.[15] The Department of Defense released a statement acknowledging that it had lost control of a UAV during the previous week, claiming that it was "flying a mission over western Afghanistan" when control was lost. The statement did not specify the model of the aircraft. The U.S. government also stated that it was still investigating the cause of the loss.[16] A Christian Science Monitor article relates an Iranian engineer's assertion that the drone was captured by jamming both satellite and land-originated control signals to the UAV, followed up by a GPS spoofing attack that fed the UAV false GPS data to make it land in Iran at what the drone thought was its home base in Afghanistan. Stephen Trimble from Flight Global assumes UAV guidance could be targeted by 1L222 Avtobaza radar jamming and deception system supplied to Iran by Russia.[17] In an interview for Nova, U.S. retired Lt. General David Deptula also said "There was a problem with the aircraft and it landed in an area it wasn't supposed to land".[18][19] American aeronautical engineers dispute this, pointing out that as is the case with the MQ-1 Predator, the MQ-9 Reaper, and the Tomahawk, "GPS is not the primary navigation sensor for the RQ-170...
Views: 71303 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER ADVANCED us navy X-47 stealth UAV Aircraft take off and landing
 
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A great idea for the US navy the x-47 uav aircraft will be useful in future conflicts. The Northrop Grumman X-47B is a demonstration unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) designed for carrier-based operations. Developed by the American defense technology company Northrop Grumman, the X-47 project began as part of DARPA's J-UCAS program, and is now part of the United States Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) program. The X-47B first flew in 2011, and as of 2014, it is undergoing flight and operational integration testing, having successfully performed a series of land- and carrier-based demonstrations.[2][3][4] Northrop Grumman intends to develop the prototype X-47B into a battlefield-ready aircraft, the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system, which will enter service by 2019.[5] In August, 2014, the US Navy announced that it had integrated the X-47B into carrier operations alongside manned aircraft.[6] Design and development Origins[edit] The US Navy did not commit to practical UCAS efforts until 2000, when the service awarded contracts of US$2 million each to Boeing and Northrop Grumman for a 15-month concept-exploration program.[7] Design considerations for a naval UCAV included dealing with the corrosive saltwater environment, deck handling for launch and recovery, integration with command and control systems, and operation in an aircraft carrier's high-electromagnetic-interference environment. The Navy was also interested in procuring UCAVs for reconnaissance missions, penetrating protected airspace to identify targets for following attack waves.[8] The J-UCAS program was terminated in February 2006 following the US military's Quadrennial Defense Review. The US Air Force and Navy proceeded with their own UAV programs. The Navy selected Northrop Grumman's X-47B as its unmanned combat air system demonstrator (UCAS-D) program.[citation needed] A new weapon system will not be developed for the X-47B, but it will be able to carry existing weapons,[9] and has a full-sized weapons bay. To provide realistic testing, the demonstration vehicle is the same size and weight as the projected operational craft.[10][11][12] The X-47B prototype rolled out from Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, on 16 December 2008. Its first flight was planned for November 2009, but the flight was delayed as the project fell behind schedule. On 29 December 2009, Northrop Grumman oversaw towed taxi tests of the aircraft at the Palmdale facility,[13] with the aircraft taxiing under its own power for the first time in January 2010. Flight testing The first flight of the X-47B demonstrator, designated Air Vehicle 1 (AV-1), took place at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on 4 February 2011.[14][15] The aircraft first flew in cruise configuration with its landing gear retracted on 30 September 2011.[16] A second X-47B demonstrator, designated AV-2, conducted its maiden flight at Edwards Air Force Base on 22 November 2011.[17] The two X-47B demonstrators were planned to have a three-year test program with 50 tests at Edwards AFB and NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, culminating in sea trials in 2013.[17][18] However, the aircraft performed so consistently that the preliminary tests stopped after 16 flights.[19] The aircraft will be used to demonstrate carrier launches and recoveries, as well as autonomous inflight refueling with a probe and drogue. The X-47B has a maximum unrefueled range of over 2,100 nautical miles (3,900 km), and an endurance of more than six hours.[20] In November 2011, the Navy announced that aerial refuelling equipment and software would be added to one of the prototype aircraft in 2014 for testing.[21] The demonstrator aircraft will never be armed.[19] In 2012, Northrop Grumman tested a wearable remote control system, designed to allow ground crews to steer the X-47B while on the carrier deck.[22] In May 2012, AV-1 began high-intensity electromagnetic interference testing at Patuxent River, to test its compatibility with planned electronic warfare systems.[23] In June 2012, AV-2 arrived at Patuxent River to begin a series of tests, including arrested landings and catapult launches, to validate the ability of the aircraft to conduct precision approaches to an aircraft carrier.[24] The drone's first land-based catapult launch was conducted successfully on 29 November 2012.[25][26] On 26 November 2012, the X-47B began its carrier-based evaluation aboard the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia.[27] On 18 December 2012, the X-47B completed its first at-sea test phase. The system was remarked to have performed "outstandingly", having proved that it was compatible with the flight deck, hangar bays, and communication systems of an aircraft carrier. With deck testing completed, the X-47B demonstrator returned to NAS Patuxent River for further tests.[28]
Views: 339450 ArmedForcesUpdate
FIRST FEMALE US Air Force Thunderbird Aerobatic Pilot
 
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An inspirational video of the first female US Air Force Thunderbird aerobatic pilot. The USAF Air Demonstration Squadron ("Thunderbirds") is the air demonstration squadron of the United States Air Force (USAF). The Thunderbirds are assigned to the 57th Wing, and are based at Nellis AFB, Nevada. Created in 1953, the USAF Thunderbirds are the third oldest formal flying aerobatic team (under the same name) in the world, after the US Navy Blue Angels formed in 1946 and the prestigious French Air Force Patrouille de France formed in 1931. The Thunderbirds Squadron tours the United States and much of the world, performing aerobatic formation and solo flying in specially marked aircraft. The squadron's name is taken from the legendary creature that appears in the mythologies of several indigenous North American cultures. On 1 March 2013, the USAF announced that due to budget cuts, aerial demonstration team performances would cease indefinitely, effective 1 April 2013.[1] On 6 December 2013 the Thunderbirds announced their 2014 schedule and the resumption of their appearances.[2] Overview The Thunderbirds Squadron is a named USAF squadron, meaning it does not carry a numerical designation. It is also one of the oldest squadrons in the Air Force, its origins dating to the organization of the 30th Aero Squadron, formed at Kelly Field, Texas on 13 June 1917.[3] Officers serve a two-year assignment with the squadron, while enlisted personnel serve three to four years. As the squadron performs no more than 88 air demonstrations each year, replacements must be trained for about half of the team each year, in order to provide a constant mix of experience. In addition to their air demonstration responsibilities, the Thunderbirds are part of the USAF combat force and if required, can be rapidly integrated into an operational fighter unit.[4][5] Since 15 February 1974 the Thunderbirds have been a component of the 57th Wing at Nellis AFB. Since 1953, they have flown in front of more than 300 million people.[6] F-16 Fighting Falcon The Thunderbirds performing the crossover break. The Thunderbirds perform aerial demonstrations in the F-16C Fighting Falcon, and they also fly two F-16D twin-seat trainers. The F-16 has been the demonstration aircraft for the Thunderbirds since the 1983 season. In January 1982, several members of the squadron were killed in what became known as the "Diamond Crash" of T-38 Talon aircraft which the squadron had flown since 1974. Partially as a result of that accident, the squadron switched to the F-16A, and sat out the 1982 airshow season and spent that year retraining and transitioning over to the new aircraft to ready themselves for the 1983 season. The F-16, however, had been considered for transition prior to the accident. In rebuilding the Thunderbird Team, the Air Force recruited previous Thunderbird pilots, qualified each in the F-16A, and had them begin by flying "two-ship" maneuvers, then expanded the program one airplane at a time up to the full six airplanes. Beginning in June 1982, the F-16 Thunderbirds were led by Major Jim Latham. The team continues to fly the F-16, having switched from the F-16A to the F-16C in 1992.[4] Only a few minor modifications differentiate a Thunderbird from an operational F-16C. These include the replacement of the 20 mm cannon and ammunition drum with a smoke-generating system, including its plumbing and control switches, the removal of the jet fuel starter exhaust door, and the application of the Thunderbirds' glossy red, white, and blue polyurethane paint scheme. All of the modification work is performed at the maintenance depot at Hill AFB near Ogden, Utah. Other than those modifications, the aircraft are taken from the standard USAF inventory as production fighters, and can be returned to an operational squadron in short order without any major modification. General Dynamics F-16A/B Fighting Falcon During the switch to the F-16A the Thunderbirds acquired new block 15 aircraft which they operated from 1983 to 1991, making the team one of the last USAF units flying the older F-16A's before transitioning into new C's. They also operated the two-seat F-16B during this time for training new pilots and for VIP flights, these being replaced by the F-16D when the rest of the squadron transitioned to the F-16C. Two F-16s demonstrate a Reflection Pass Lockheed Martin F-16C/D Fighting Falcon (Block 32) The block 32H/J aircraft currently assigned to the Thunderbirds were built in 1986 and 1987, and operated by the Thunderbirds from 1992 to 2008. At their retirement, they were some of the oldest operational F-16s in the Air Force. Lockheed Martin F-16C/D Fighting Falcon (Block 52) In the 2009 show season the Thunderbirds transitioned to an updated version of the F-16 fighter. The Block 52s have an upgraded avionics package that brings the Thunderbird fleet into alignment with the rest of the worldwide F-16 fleet.
Views: 858383 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER POWERFUL South African Military Off Road Trucks
 
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The South African military Marauder Military off road vehicle was recently seen on Top Gear a very popular television show. This new vehicle will make a big difference for the south African military. The Marauder[1] is an armoured, mine-protected vehicle that is produced by Paramount Group in South Africa. It was launched during the 2007 International Defence Exhibition (IDEX) and Conference in Abu Dhabi, the largest arms exhibition in the Middle East.[2][3][4] Design and Specifications[edit] The Marauder was developed for reconnaissance and peacekeeping missions. It carries a crew of up to ten, including a driver and commander. Originally designed to operate in urban, built-up and confined areas it is smaller in both size and weight than the Matador, a similarly armoured vehicle. Vehicle configuration is either 4x4 or a 6x6. The Marauder has a cruising speed of around 100 to 120 km/h (62–75 mph), and a maximum range of 700 kilometres (430 mi). The Marauder’s double-skin monocoque hull provides protection against projectiles up to STANAG 4569 Level III for the crew compartment.[5] The Marauder’s payload capacity allows for the fitting of various defence and weapons systems, including light and medium-calibre machine guns, cannon weapon installations, and missile launchers, as well as command, surveillance, and control systems. The vehicle can be configured such that mortars may be fired from the payload platform.[6] Type Armoured personnel carrier Place of origin South Africa Service history Used by Azerbaijani Armed Forces African Union Production history Manufacturer Paramount Group Produced 2008–present Number built ~250 Specifications Weight Curb: 9,900 kg (21,780 lb) Combat: 15,000 kg (33,000 lb) Crew 2 + 8 passengers Armor Ballistic protection: STANAG 4569 level III (7.62 × 51 mm AP WC Core at 30 meters) and mine blast protection: STANAG 4569 3a and 3b (single anti-tank mine (8 kg of TNT under the hull and under any wheel) Engine Cummins ISBe4-300 Diesel (221kW/300hp @ 2500rpm, 1100Nm @ 1200-1800rpm) MAN D0836LOH Diesel (176kW/240hp @ 2300rpm, 925Nm @ 1200-1800rpm) Payload capacity 6,000 kg (13,227 lb) Suspension 4x4 or 6x6 wheeled[1] Ground clearance 420 mm Operational range 700 km (435 mi) Speed 100–120 km/h (tyre dependent) Production[edit] In 2008, for the manufacturing and production of the Marauder, the Paramount Group entered into an agreement with the King Abdullah Design and Development Bureau (KADDB), Jordan’s primary governmental military agency that develops and manufactures defence systems,[7] and which serves as an independent technical advisor to the Jordanian Armed Forces (JAF). As well as being a manufacturer, Jordan was the first customer for the Marauder.[8] In popular culture[edit] In June 2011, the civilian version of the Marauder was featured in British motoring program Top Gear,[9] with Richard Hammond. The focus of the roadtest was to test the Marauder against the discontinued Hummer H3. Unlike the original Hummer H1, the Hummer H3 is a civilian model based on the Chevrolet Colorado. Among the activities tested were ordering fast-food from a drive-through restaurant, driving off-road, through/over obstacles (solid brick walls and parked cars, respectively) and testing how well it could withstand an explosion (seven pounds of plastic explosives) directed at its underside.[10] Unlike the (civilian spec) Hummer H3, which was completely destroyed by the explosion, the Marauder was still operational and sustained only minor damage for the most part, Hammond easily managing to drive it away despite its dislodged/blown tyre. Operators Azerbaijan — 65 South Africa South Africa — ~50 Jordan Jordan — ~50 The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) comprises the armed forces of South Africa. The commander of the SANDF is appointed by the President of South Africa from one of the armed services. They are in turn accountable to the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans of the Defence Department. The military as it exists today was created in 1994,[4][5] following South Africa's first post-apartheid national elections and the adoption of a new constitution. It replaced the South African Defence Force. History[edit] The SANDF took over the personnel and equipment from the SADF and integrated forces from the former Bantustan homelands forces,[6]:5 as well as personnel from the former guerrilla forces of some of the political parties involved in South Africa, such as the African National Congress's Umkhonto we Sizwe, the Pan Africanist Congress's Azanian People's Liberation Army and the Self-Protection Units of the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP).[4] As of 2004, the integration process was considered complete, with retaining personnel, structure, and equipment from the SADF. However, due to integration problems, financial constraints, and other issues, the SANDF faced capability constraints.'[7]
Views: 205072 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Air Force FASTEST STRATEGIC AIRCRAFT ever the XB-70 Valkyrie
 
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A great idea for the us air force the XB 70 Valkyrie would have served the us air force very well. The North American Aviation XB-70 Valkyrie was the prototype of the B-70 nuclear-armed, deep-penetration strategic bomber for the Strategic Air Command of the U.S. Air Force. In the 1950s, the North American Aviation company designed the Valkyrie bomber as a large, six-engine aircraft capable of reaching Mach 3+ while flying at 70,000 feet (21,000 m), which velocity and altitude capabilities would allow the evasion of interceptor aircraft, then the only effective weapon against bomber aircraft. In 1961, improved, high-altitude surface-to-air missiles (SAMs), the U.S. Air Force's doctrinal change to low-level penetration bombing, the large development costs of the B-70 program, and the introduction of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) to the U.S. nuclear arsenal, led to the cancellation of the B-70 program. As such, two prototype aircraft were built, and designated XB-70A; these aircraft were used for supersonic test-flights during 1964–69. In 1966, one prototype crashed after colliding in midair with a smaller jet aircraft; the remaining Valkyrie bomber is in the National Museum of the United States Air Force, in Ohio. Design[edit] The Valkyrie was designed to be a high-altitude Mach 3 bomber with six engines. Harrison Storms shaped the aircraft[68] with a canard surface and a delta wing, which was built largely of stainless steel, sandwiched honeycomb panels, and titanium. The XB-70 was designed to use supersonic technologies developed for the Mach 3 Navaho, as well as a modified form of the SM-64 Navaho's all-inertial guidance system.[69] The XB-70 used compression lift, which was generated from a prominent wedge at the center of the engine inlets that created a shock wave below the aircraft. The wing included inboard camber to more effectively use the higher pressure field behind the strong shock wave (the airflow at the XB-70 wing's leading edge was subsonic).[70] The compression lift increased the lift by five percent.[71] Unique among aircraft of its size, the outer portions of the wings were hinged, and could be pivoted downward by up to 65 degrees. This increased the aircraft's directional stability at supersonic speeds, shifted the center of lift to a more favorable position at high speeds, and strengthened the compression lift effect.[72] With the wingtips drooped downwards, the compression lift shock wave would be further trapped under the wings. The XB-70 was equipped with six General Electric YJ93-GE-3 turbojet engines, designed to use JP-6 jet fuel. The engine was stated to be in the "30,000-pound class", but actually produced 28,000 lbf (124.6 kN) with afterburner and 19,900 lbf (88 kN) without afterburner.[73][74] The Valkyrie used fuel for cooling; it was pumped through heat exchangers before reaching the engines.[25] To reduce the likelihood of autoignition, nitrogen was injected into the JP-6 during refueling, and the "fuel pressurization and inerting system" vaporized a 700 lb (320 kg) supply of liquid nitrogen to fill the fuel tank vent space and maintain tank pressure.[75] Development[edit] Background[edit] Main article: WS-110A As an offshoot of Boeing's MX-2145 manned boost-glide bomber project, Boeing partnered with RAND Corporation in January 1954 to explore what sort of aircraft would be needed to deliver the various nuclear weapons then under development. Providing for a long range and high payload were obvious requirements, but they also concluded that after release of nuclear bombs the bomber would need supersonic speed to escape the critical blast-radius. The aircraft also had to be large to carry a reasonable bomb load and a high fuel load for the unrefueled range required from the continental United States to the Soviet Union.[2] For some time the aviation industry had been examining this problem. From the mid-1940s, there was much interest in using nuclear-powered aircraft in the bomber role.[3][4][N 1] In a conventional jet engine, thrust is provided by accelerating air, which is accomplished by heating it with burning jet fuel. In a nuclear engine, heat is supplied by a reactor, although a small amount of jet fuel was carried for use during high-power portions of flight—take-off and high-speed dashes. Another possibility was the use of boron-enriched "zip fuels", which improved the energy density of the fuel by about 40 percent,[5] and could be used in versions of existing jet engine designs.[5] Zip fuels appeared to offer sufficient performance improvement to produce a strategic bomber with supersonic speed. The U.S. Air Force followed these developments closely, and in 1955 issued General Operational Requirement No. 38 for a new bomber with the payload and intercontinental range of the B-52 and the Mach 2 top speed of the Convair B-58 Hustler.[6] The new bomber was expected to enter service in 1963.[7][N 2]
Views: 2788087 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER FAST US Navy HSV 2 Swift Catamaran
 
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The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is larger than the next 13 largest navies combined in terms of battle fleet tonnage, according to one estimate.[5][6] The U.S. Navy also has the world's largest carrier fleet, with 10 in service, one under construction (two planned), and two in reserve. The service has 317,054 personnel on active duty and 109,671 in the Navy Reserve. It operates 283 ships in active service and more than 3,700 aircraft.[3] HSV-2 Swift is a non-commissioned, hybrid catamaran originally leased by the United States Navy as a mine countermeasures and sea basing test platform. She is now privately owned and operated by Sealift Inc. and chartered to the United States Navy Military Sealift Command. She is primarily used for fleet support and humanitarian partnership missions. The HSV stands for "High Speed Vessel", and its home port is Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek in Norfolk, Virginia. The vessel has two CONMAR crews that typically rotate every three months to keep the ship deployed eleven months per year. The minimum crew size is 35; 18 are military with the balance civilian, provided through American Maritime Officers and Seafarers International Union. On rare occasion that she is in a United States port, it is usually Naval Station Mayport, Florida, supporting the Fourth Fleet or Charleston, South Carolina, for major maintenance. Rota, Spain, is considered by the crew to be the "Mediterranean home away from home".[1] The ship was constructed by the Australian shipbuilder Incat in Hobart, Tasmania, and was leased to the U.S. Navy through Bollinger/Incat of Lockport, Louisiana. She was the second catamaran the Navy leased to test new technologies and concepts associated with the Chief of Naval Operations's "Seapower 21" plan. The contract value for the first year was $21.7 million. Swift is the fourth Incat-built high-speed wave piercing catamaran to enter military service, following behind HMAS Jervis Bay, U.S. Army Vessel (USAV) Theater Support Vessel Spearhead (TSV-X1) and HSV-X1 Joint Venture. It is a wave-piercing, aluminum-hulled, commercial catamaran with military enhancements, such as a helicopter flight deck, strengthened vehicle deck, small boat and unmanned vehicle launch and recovery capability, and an enhanced communications suite. It features a new, modular design, which will allow the ship to be refitted to support any mission without requiring long shipyard periods. While from the front the vessels appear to look like a trimaran, the centre hull does not rest in the water and is not used for buoyancy. As a logistics vessel, it does not have water-tight compartments or weapons systems. Its propulsion is provided by directional water jets, so it doesn't have propellers or a rudder for steering and can maneuver in twelve feet of water.[1] The Pentagon is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, Virginia. As a symbol of the U.S. military, "the Pentagon" is often used metonymically to refer to the U.S. Department of Defense rather than the building itself. Designed by American architect George Bergstrom (1876--1955), and built by general contractor John McShain of Philadelphia, the building was dedicated on January 15, 1943, after ground was broken for construction on September 11, 1941. General Brehon Somervell provided the major motive power behind the project;[4] Colonel Leslie Groves was responsible for overseeing the project for the U.S. Army. The Pentagon is a large office building, with about 6,500,000 sq ft (600,000 m2), of which 3,700,000 sq ft (340,000 m2) are used as offices.[5][6] Approximately 28,000 military and civilian employees[6] and about 3,000 non-defense support personnel work in the Pentagon. It has five sides, five floors above ground, two basement levels, and five ring corridors per floor with a total of 17.5 mi (28.2 km)[6] of corridors. The Pentagon includes a five-acre (20,000 m2) central plaza, which is shaped like a pentagon and informally known as "ground zero," a nickname originating during the Cold War and based on the presumption that the Soviet Union would target one or more nuclear missiles at this central location in the outbreak of a nuclear war.[7] The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic[10][11] consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, and a federal district. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific.
Views: 999910 ArmedForcesUpdate
UK Royal Air Force ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY to keep the world safe
 
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The United Kingdom Royal Air Force demonstrates the effectiveness of their brimstone Air-to-surface missile. Brimstone is an air-launched ground attack missile developed by MBDA for Britain's Royal Air Force. It was originally intended for "fire-and-forget" use against mass formations of enemy armour, using a millimetric wave (mmW) active radar homing seeker to ensure accuracy even against moving targets. Experience in Afghanistan led to the addition of laser guidance in the dual-mode Brimstone missile, allowing a "spotter" to pick out specific targets when friendly forces or civilians were in the area. The tandem shaped charge warhead is much more effective against modern tanks than older similar weapons such as the AGM-65G Maverick, while the small blast area minimises collateral damage. Three Brimstones are carried on a launcher that occupies a single weapon station, allowing a single aircraft to carry many missiles. After a protracted development programme, single-mode or "millimetric" Brimstone entered service with RAF Tornado aircraft in 2005, and the dual-mode variant in 2008. The latter has been extensively used in Afghanistan and Libya. An improved Brimstone 2 was expected to enter service in October 2012, but problems with the new warhead from TDW[4] and the ROXEL rocket motor put back the planned date to November 2015. MBDA is working on the targeting of swarms of small boats under the name Sea Spear. The RAF intend to fit Brimstone to their Eurofighter Typhoons, and planned to integrate it with their Harriers until they were withdrawn from service in 2010. MBDA is studying the use of Brimstone on ships, attack helicopters, UAVs, and from surface launchers; it will be integrated on the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II when the F-35B enters British service. The United States, France and India have expressed interest in buying Brimstone for their aircraft, but Saudi Arabia is the only export customer as of 2015. Type Air-to-surface missile Place of origin United Kingdom Service history In service 2005 Used by Royal Air Force Royal Saudi Air Force Wars Operation Telic Operation Herrick Operation Ellamy Operation Shader Production history Designer GEC-Marconi Designed 1996 Manufacturer MBDA (UK) Ltd, Lostock Unit cost (Dual Mode Variant) £105,000/unit[1] £175,000 inc development[2] Produced 1999 Specifications Weight 48.5 kg Length 1.8 m Diameter 17.8 cm Warhead HEAT tandem warhead Detonation mechanism Crush (impact) fuze Engine Solid-fuel rocket Operational range Brimstone I: 20+ km (12+ mi) from fixed wing, 12 km (7.5 mi) from rotor wing Brimstone II: 60+ km (37+ mi) from fixed wing, 40+ km (25+ mi) from rotor wing[3][N 1] Speed Supersonic (~450m/s) Guidance system 94 GHz millimetric wave Active radar homing and INS autopilot, dual-mode adds laser guidance Accuracy = sub-1m CEP[3] Steering system Flight control surfaces Launch platform Tornado GR4 Typhoon (planned) Ship (planned)[specify] Design[edit] Overview[edit] The missile was originally supposed to be an evolution of the original laser Hellfire, with the laser seeker replaced by a millimetre wave (mmW) seeker. During development, virtually the entire missile was redesigned, resulting in a weapon that - other than the external shape - bears no relation to the original airframe. It is unrelated to the separate development of the mmW Hellfire for the Apache Longbow. The missile airframe is developed from Lockheed's AGM-114 Hellfire, but Brimstone is an all-new design with its own motor, warhead and seeker.[5] Brimstone has a Tandem Shaped Charge (TSC) warhead that employs a smaller initial charge, designed to initiate reactive armor, followed by a larger, more destructive charge, designed to penetrate and defeat the base armour. It has been estimated that Brimstone will be 3 times more effective than the AGM-65G Maverick missile against modern tanks, and 7 times more effective than the BL755 cluster bomb.[6] In combat Brimstone has demonstrated accuracy and reliability "both well above 90 percent" according to the MoD;[7] Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Dalton has said that 98.3% to 98.7% of Brimstone fired in Libya "did exactly what we expected".[8] Targeting and sensors[edit] Brimstone is a "fire-and-forget" missile, which is loaded with targeting data by the Weapon Systems Officer (WSO) prior to launch. It is programmable to adapt to particular mission requirements. This capability includes essentially the ability to find targets within a certain area (such as those near friendly forces), and to self-destruct if it is unable to find a target within the designated area. This information is provided to the munition by the WSO from RAF ASTOR, USAF Northrop Grumman E-8 Joint STARS aircraft or local troops. In addition to the semi-autonomous ability to decide its own targets, the Brimstone has the capacity to determine where on a target to best impact causing the most damage or resulting in elimination of the target.
Views: 46124 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS SMALLEST UAV Aircraft !!! British Military Black Hornet UAV
 
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A great video of the worlds smallest military UAV aircraft. The British Army Black Hornet Nano UAV Aircraft will make a difference on the modern battlefield. The Black Hornet Nano is a military micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by Prox Dynamics AS of Norway, and in use by the Norwegian and British Army. The unit measures around 10 × 2.5 cm (4 × 1 in) and provides troops on the ground with local situational awareness. They are small enough to fit in one hand and weigh just over half an ounce (16 g, including batteries). The UAV is equipped with a camera, which gives the operator full-motion video and still images. They were developed as part of a £20 million contract for 160 units with Marlborough Communications Ltd.[1][2][3] Operational history[edit] The aircraft are being used by soldiers from the UK's Brigade Reconnaissance Force at Camp Bastion in Afghanistan.[4] Operation Herrick personnel in Afghanistan deploy the Black Hornet from the front line to fly into enemy territory to take video and still images before returning to the operator. Designed to blend in with the muddy grey walls in Afghanistan, and capable of flying for 20 minutes on quiet electric motors, it has been used to look around corners or over walls and other obstacles to identify any hidden dangers and enemy positions. The Black Hornet is connected to the operator with a digital data-link and GPS. Images are displayed on a small handheld terminal, which can be used by the operator to control the UAV.[5] The Black Hornet is launched from a small box that can be strapped to a utility belt, which also stores transmitted data so a captured drone won't reveal anything it recorded. Operators can steer the UAV or set waypoints for it to fly itself.[6] As of 25 October 2013, the British Army had 324 Hornet Nanos in service.[7] In July 2014, the United States Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) selected the PD-100 Black Hornet after looking at commercially available small-scale UAVs as part of the Cargo Pocket Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (CP-ISR) program. It concluded that further refinements were needed for a U.S. Army role including reconfiguring the data-link, giving it night vision, and improving navigational capability.[8] The Black Hornet was tested with U.S. troops at an event in early March 2015,[9] and Prox Dynamics delivered a PD-100 with upgraded features for special forces testing in June 2015.[10] In October 2014, Prox Dynamics unveiled a version of its PD-100 Black Hornet with night vision capabilities, fitted with both long-wave infrared and day video sensors that can transmit video streams or high-resolution still images via a digital data-link with a 1 mi (1.6 km) range. Over 3,000 Black Hornets had been delivered to date.[11] An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, and also referred to as an unmanned aerial vehicle and a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. Its flight is controlled either autonomously by onboard computers or by the remote control of a pilot on the ground or in another vehicle. ICAO classify unmanned aircraft into two types under Circular 328 AN/190:[1] Autonomous aircraft – currently considered unsuitable for regulation due to legal and liability issues Remotely piloted aircraft – subject to civil regulation under ICAO and under the relevant national aviation authority The typical launch and recovery method of an unmanned aircraft is by the function of an automatic system or an external operator on the ground.[2] Historically, UAVs were simple remotely piloted aircraft, but autonomous control is increasingly being employed.[3][not in citation given]. The Nazi-German V-1 flying bomb flew autonomously powered by a pulsejet. They are usually deployed for military and special operation applications, but also used in a growing number of civil applications,[4] such as policing and firefighting, and nonmilitary security work, such as inspection of power or pipelines. UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too "dull, dirty or dangerous"[5] for manned aircraft. Definition and terminology[edit] To distinguish UAVs from missiles, a UAV is defined as a "powered, aerial vehicle that does not carry a human operator, uses aerodynamic forces to provide vehicle lift, can fly autonomously or be piloted remotely, can be expendable or recoverable, and can carry a lethal or nonlethal payload".[6] Therefore, cruise missiles are not considered UAVs because, like many other guided missiles, the vehicle itself is a weapon that is not reused, even though it is also unmanned and in some cases remotely guided. The key feature which differentiates drone UAVs from Radio-controlled aircraft is the presence of an autopilot capable of autonomous flight;
Views: 101897 ArmedForcesUpdate
AWESOME AIR SHOW Baltic Bees Aerobatic Aircraft display
 
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A great airshow aerobatic display by the Baltic bees and MigFlug. Aerobatics (a portmanteau of aerial-acrobatics) is the practice of flying maneuvers involving aircraft attitudes that are not used in normal flight.[1][2] Aerobatics are performed in airplanes and gliders for training, recreation, entertainment, and sport. Additionally, some helicopters, such as the MBB Bo 105, are capable of limited aerobatic maneuvers.[3] An example of a fully aerobatic helicopter, capable of performing loops and rolls, is the Westland Lynx. The term is sometimes referred to as acrobatics, especially when translated.[citation needed] Most aerobatic maneuvers involve rotation of the aircraft about its longitudinal (roll) axis or lateral (pitch) axis. Other maneuvers, such as a spin, displace the aircraft about its vertical (yaw) axis.[4] Maneuvers are often combined to form a complete aerobatic sequence for entertainment or competition. Aerobatic flying requires a broader set of piloting skills and exposes the aircraft to greater structural stress than for normal flight.[5] In some countries, the pilot must wear a parachute when performing aerobatics.[6] While many pilots fly aerobatics for recreation, some choose to fly in aerobatic competitions, a refereed sport.[7] Overview In the early days of flying, some pilots used their aircraft as part of a flying circus to entertain. Among the earliest innovators in aerobatics the Frenchman Euclid's name is foremost. Maneuvers were flown for artistic reasons or to draw gasps from onlookers. In due course some of these maneuvers were found to allow aircraft to gain tactical advantage during aerial combat or dogfights between fighter aircraft. Aerobatic aircraft fall into two categories—specialist aerobatic, and aerobatic capable. Specialist designs such as the Pitts Special, the Extra 200 and 300, and the Sukhoi Su-26M and Sukhoi Su-29 aim for ultimate aerobatic performance. This comes at the expense of general purpose use such as touring, or ease of non aerobatic handling such as landing. At a more basic level, aerobatic capable aircraft, such as the Cessna 152 Aerobat model, can be dual purpose—equipped to carrying passengers and luggage, as well as being capable of basic aerobatic figures. Flight formation aerobatics are flown by teams of up to sixteen aircraft, although most teams fly between four and ten aircraft.[8] Some are state funded to reflect pride in the armed forces while others are commercially sponsored. Coloured smoke trails may be emitted to emphasise the patterns flown and/or the colours of a national flag. Usually each team will use aircraft similar to one another finished in a special and dramatic colour scheme, thus emphasising their entertainment function. Teams often fly V-formations (otherwise known as echelon formation)— they will not fly directly behind another aircraft because of danger from wake vortices or engine exhaust. Aircraft will always fly slightly below the aircraft in front, if they have to follow in line (the "trail formation"). The UK Swift Aerobatic Display Team at Kemble Battle of Britain Weekend 2009. A Swift glider is performing continuous full rolls while towed by a Piper Pawnee Aerobatic maneuvers flown in a jet-powered aircraft are limited in scope as they cannot take advantage of the gyroscopic forces that a propeller driven aircraft can exploit. Jet-powered aircraft also tend to fly much faster, which increases the size of the figures and the length of time the pilot has to withstand increased g-forces. Jet aerobatic teams often fly in formations, which further restricts the maneuvers that can be safely flown. To enhance the effect of aerobatic maneuveres smoke is sometimes generated; the smoke allows viewers to see the path travelled by the aircraft. Due to safety concerns, the smoke is not a result of combustion but is produced by the vaporization of fog oil into a fine aerosol, achieved either by injecting the oil into the hot engine exhaust[9] or by the use of a dedicated device[10] that can be fitted in any position on the aircraft. The first military aerobatic team to use smoke at will during displays was Fleet Air Arm 702 Squadron "The Black Cats" at the Farnborough Airshow in September 1957.[11] Training[edit] Aerobatics are taught to military fighter pilots as a means of developing flying skills and for tactical use in combat. Aerobatics and formation flying is not limited solely to fixed-wing aircraft; the British Army, Royal Navy, Spanish Air Force and the Indian Air Force, among others, have helicopter display teams. All aerobatic maneuvers demand training and practice to avoid accidents. Such accidents are rare but can result in fatalities. Low-level aerobatics are extremely demanding and airshow pilots must demonstrate their ability before being allowed to gradually reduce the height at which they may fly their show. Competition[edit]
Views: 24478 ArmedForcesUpdate
NASA to build NEW ADVANCED supersonic aircraft for faster travel
 
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A new advanced supersonic aircraft is to be built by nasa. BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.--Twenty-six years ago today, Beale said goodbye to the fastest air-breathing jet in the world, the SR-71 Blackbird. The Blackbird was an advanced, long-range, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft that called Beale Air Force Base home from January 1966 to January 1990. But for Master Sgt. Floyd Jones (ret.) and a local group of former Blackbird maintainers, the mission continues, not with turning wrenches, but with the same elbow grease. "It's not glamorous but it needs to be done," said Jones, who worked on the Blackbird for nearly 20 years. Floyd and members of The Blackbird Maintainers group wash and scrub down the SR-71 periodically to ensure the static display is looking its best. "It's a beautiful aircraft," said Master Sgt. (ret.) John Olp, a 10-year Blackbird veteran. "But some of the local wildlife prefer to roost on it." Local birds, weather, wind and dust are all contributing factors that lead to the Blackbird getting an occasional bath. "We try not to let it get too dirty," Jones said. "We take a pressure washer to it and scrub it down, it takes a couple of hours but we have a goodtime with it." In addition to the Blackbird Maintainers, the 9th Maintenance Squadron intermittently performs spot cleaning on the aircraft. Jones said that for many former maintainers it's just another way to reconnect with fellow servicemen and trade "war stories" about the Air Force and the aircraft they enjoyed working on. "It's a rare plane," Jones said. "We have to take care of it for future generations to cherish." Developed in secrecy by Lockheed's Skunk Works division in Palmdale, California, only 32 were built. None were ever lost to enemy action. "This jet was ahead of its time," Jones said. "We all love this aircraft and none of us mind taking care of her into the retirement years." Video Description Credit: Staff Sgt. Robert Trujillo Video Credit: NASA Video Thumbnail Credit: NASA/The Boeing Company This file is in the public domain in the United States because it was solely created by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted Modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
Views: 17253 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Military NEW IMPROVED Tilt-rotor transport Aircraft better than V-22
 
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The US Military unveiled the Agusta Westland AW609 tilt rotor transport aircraft an alternative to the V-22 Osprey. The AgustaWestland AW609, formerly the Bell/Agusta BA609, is a twin-engined tiltrotor VTOL aircraft with a configuration similar to the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey. It is capable of landing vertically like a helicopter while having a range and speed in excess of conventional rotorcraft. The AW609 is aimed at the civil aviation market, in particular VIP customers and offshore oil and gas operators. Design The AW609 is a tiltrotor aircraft capable of landing where conventional fixed wing aircraft cannot, such as heliports or very small airports, while having twice the speed and the range of any available helicopter.[51] Outwardly, the AW609 appears to be similar to the military-orientated V-22 Osprey; however, the two aircraft share few components. Unlike the V-22, the AW609 has a pressurised cabin.[51][52] As of 2013, multiple AW609 cabin configurations have been projected, including a standard nine-passenger layout, a six-to-seven-passenger VIP/executive cabin, and a search and rescue model featuring a hoist/basket and four single seats; medevac and patrol/surveillance-orientated variants has also been proposed.[53] It has a two-piece clamshell door that is 35 inches (89 cm) wide.[25] The AW609 is powered by a pair of Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6C-67A turboshaft engines, which each drive a three-bladed proprotor. Both of the engine and proprotor pairs are mounted on a load-bearing rotatable pylon at the wing's ends, allowing the proprotors to be positioned at various angles. In helicopter mode, the proprotors can be positioned between a 75- and 95-degree angle from the horizontal, with 87 degrees being the typical selection for hovering vertically.[54] In airplane mode, the proprotors are rotated forward and locked in position at a zero-degree angle, spinning at 84% RPM.[24] The flight control software handles much of the complexity of the transitioning between helicopter and airplane modes;[24] automated systems also guide pilots to the correct tilt angle and air speed settings.[54] When flying in airplane mode, the majority of lift is produced by the AW609's wings, which are slightly forward-swept. The 34-foot (10 m) long wings feature flaperon control surfaces which are normally automatically controlled; in vertical flight, the flaperons drop to a 66-degree downwards angle to reduce the wing area being encountered by downwash from the proprotors. A high-mounted rudderless vertical stabiliser is attached the rear of the fuselage to stabilise flight while in aircraft mode.[54] In the event of a single engine failure, either engine can provide power to both proprotors via a drive shaft; the AW609 is also capable of autorotation.[32][52] The AW609 will have a sink rate warning system.[55] Avionics include a triple-redundant digital fly-by-wire flight control system, a head-up display system, and Full Authority Digital Engine Controls (FADEC). The cockpit has been designed so that the AW609 can be flown by a single pilot in instrument flight rules conditions.[32][56][57] Several of the aircraft's controls, such as blade pitch, are designed to resemble and function like their counterparts on conventional rotorcraft, enabling helicopter pilots to transition to the type more easily.[24][54] Following AgustaWestland's full acquisition of the program, a substantial modernisation of the AW609's design was initiated in 2012; these changes included new engines and the redesigning of the cockpit. As part of the design refresh, new flight management systems, Northrop Grumman inertial and GPS navigation systems, and various other avionics from Rockwell Collins were adopted.[28][58][59] General characteristics[edit] Crew: 1 or 2 Capacity: 6 to 9 passengers or 5,500 lb (2,500 kg) payload Length: 44 ft (13.4 m) Height: 16 ft 3 in (5.0 m) nacelles vertical; 21 ft 10 in (6.7 m) nacelles horizontal Wingspan: 38 ft 5 in (11.7 m) Width with rotors: 60 ft 5 in (18.4 m) Rotor diameter: 25 ft 10 in (7.9 m) each Rotor area: 981.75 sq ft (91.2 m2) Empty weight: 10,483 lb (4,755 kg) Useful load: 5,500 lb (2,500 kg) Fuel: 2,480 lb (1,120 kg)[76] Fuel burn: 1,000 lb (450 kg) per hour[77] Max. takeoff weight: 16,800 lb (7,600 kg) Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6C-67A turboshaft, 1,940 shp (1,447 kW) each Performance[edit] Maximum speed: 275 kn (509 km/h; 316 mph)[66] Cruise speed: 260 kn (482 km/h; 299 mph) Range: 750 nmi (1,390 km; 860 mi). With external tanks: 1,100 nmi (2,000 km; 1,300 mi) [78] Ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,600 m),[66] 5,000 ft (1,500 m) HOGE[54] Rate of climb: 1,500 ft/min (7.6 m/s) Gravity load: +3.1, -1.0 g[79] Disk loading: 15.8 lb/sq ft (77.1 kg/m2) Origins and program changes[edit] The BA609 drew on experience gained from Bell's earlier experimental tiltrotor, the XV-15.[1][2]
Views: 76245 ArmedForcesUpdate
Worlds MOST FEARED !!! US Navy Guided Missile Destroyers & Cruiser Naval Ships
 
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The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. The U.S. Navy is currently the largest, most powerful navy in the world,[7][8][9] with the highest combined battle fleet tonnage.[10] The U.S. Navy has the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with ten in service, two in the reserve fleet,[11]and three new class carriers under construction.[12] The service has 328,186 personnel on active duty and 110,882 in the Navy Reserve. It has 272 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 aircraft in active service as of September 2015.[3] The U.S. Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which was established during the American Revolutionary War and was essentially disbanded as a separate entity shortly thereafter. It played a major role in the American Civil War by blockading the Confederacy and seizing control of its rivers. It played the central role in the World War II defeat of Japan. The 21st century U.S. Navy maintains a sizable global presence, deploying in such areas as East Asia, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East. It is a blue-water navy with the ability to project force onto the littoral regions of the world, engage in forward areas during peacetime, and rapidly respond to regional crises, making it an active player in U.S. foreign and defense policy. The Navy is administratively managed by the Department of the Navy, which is headed by the civilian Secretary of the Navy. The Department of the Navy is itself a division of the Department of Defense, which is headed by the Secretary of Defense. The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is a four-star admiral and the senior naval officer of the Department of the Navy.[13] However, the CNO may not be the highest ranking naval officer in the armed forces if the Chairman or the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are Navy officers, who by law, outrank the CNO. Mission[edit] The mission of the Navy is to maintain, train and equip combat-ready Naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas. — Mission statement of the United States Navy[14] From the New Recruits Handbook:[15] The mission of the United States Navy is to protect and defend the right of the United States and our allies to move freely on the oceans and to protect our country against her enemies. The United States Navy is a seaborne branch of the military of the United States. The Navy's three primary areas of responsibility:[16] The preparation of naval forces necessary for the effective prosecution of war The maintenance of naval aviation, including land-based naval aviation, air transport essential for naval operations and all air weapons and air techniques involved in the operations and activities of the Navy The development of aircraft, weapons, tactics, technique, organization, and equipment of naval combat and service elements. U.S. Navy training manuals state that the mission of the U.S. Armed Forces is "to prepare and conduct prompt and sustained combat operations in support of the national interest. "As part of that establishment, the U.S. Navy's functions comprise sea control, power projection and nuclear deterrence, in addition to "sealift" duties.[17] History[edit] Main article: History of the United States Navy Origins[edit] It follows then as certain as that night succeeds the day, that without a decisive naval force we can do nothing definitive, and with it, everything honorable and glorious. — George Washington[18] The Navy was rooted in the American seafaring tradition, which produced a large community of sailors, captains and shipbuilders in the colonial era.[19] In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, Massachusetts had its own navy. The establishment of a national navy was an issue of debate among the members of the Second Continental Congress. Supporters argued that a navy would protect shipping, defend the coast, and make it easier to seek out support from foreign countries. Detractors countered that challenging the British Royal Navy, then the world's preeminent naval power, was a foolish undertaking. Commander in Chief George Washington resolved the debate when he commissioned seven ocean-going cruisers, starting with the schooner USS Hannah, to interdict British supply ships, and reported the captures to the Congress. The Continental Navy achieved mixed results; it was successful in a number of engagements and raided many British merchant vessels, but it lost 24 of its vessels[20] and at one point was reduced to two in active service.[21] The Continental Navy was disbanded at war's end.
Views: 92881 ArmedForcesUpdate
ONE OF A KIND Russian Air Force Su 47 Berkut  fighter jet  to challenge US Air force F-22
 
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This was the first Russian air force prototype to challenge the us air force F-22 Raptor The Sukhoi Su-47 Berkut (Russian: Су-47 Беркут—Golden Eagle) (NATO reporting name Firkin), also designated S-32 and S-37 (not to be confused with the twin-engined delta canard design[1] offered by Sukhoi in the early 1990s under the designation Su-37) during initial development, was an experimental supersonic jet fighter developed by Sukhoi Aviation Corporation. A distinguishing feature of the aircraft was its forward-swept wing[2] that gave the aircraft excellent agility and maneuverability. While serial production of the type never materialized, the sole aircraft produced served as a technology demonstrator prototype for a number of advanced technologies later used in the 4.5 generation fighter SU-35BM and current fifth-generation jet fighter prototype Sukhoi PAK FA T-50. Originally known as the S-37, Sukhoi redesignated its advanced test aircraft as the Su-47 in 2002. Officially nicknamed Berkut (Golden Eagle), the Su-47 was originally built as Russia's principal testbed for composite materials and sophisticated fly-by-wire control systems. Russia Listeni/ˈrʌʃə/ or /ˈrʊʃə/ (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya, IPA: [rɐˈsʲijə] ( listen)), also officially known as the Russian Federation[10] (Russian: Российская Федерация, tr. Rossiyskaya Federatsiya, IPA: [rɐˈsʲijskəjə fʲɪdʲɪˈrat͡sɨjə] ( listen)), is a country in northern Eurasia.[11] It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the US state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At 17,075,400 square kilometres (6,592,800 sq mi), Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012.[12] Extending across the entirety of northern Asia and much of Europe, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven American uniformed services. Initially part of the United States Army, the USAF was formed as a separate branch of the military on 18 September 1947 under the National Security Act of 1947.[5] It is the most recent branch of the U.S. military to be formed, and is the largest and one of the world's most technologically advanced air forces. The USAF articulates its core functions as Nuclear Deterrence Operations, Special Operations, Air Superiority, Global Integrated ISR, Space Superiority, Command and Control, Cyberspace Superiority, Personnel Recovery, Global Precision Attack, Building Partnerships, Rapid Global Mobility and Agile Combat Support.[6] The Russian Air Force (Russian: Военно-воздушные cилы России, tr. Voyenno-vozdushnye sily Rossii) is the aerial warfare service branch of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. It is currently under the command of Lieutenant General Viktor Bondarev. The Russian Navy has its own air arm, the Russian Naval Aviation, which is the former Soviet Aviatsiya Voyenno Morskogo Flota ("Naval Aviation"), or AV-MF). The Air Force was formed from parts of the former Soviet Air Forces after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991--92. Boris Yeltsin's creation of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation on 7 May 1992, can be taken as a convenient formation date for the new Air Force. Since that time, the Air Force has suffered severe setbacks due to lack of resources, and has constantly shrunk in size. Since Vladimir Putin became President of the Russian Federation however, much more money has been allocated to the Armed Forces as a whole. The United States of America (USA or U.S.A.), commonly referred to as the United States (US or U.S.), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic[10][11] consisting of 50 states and a federal district. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C. are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America, west of Canada and east of Russia which is across the Bering Strait in Asia, and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-North Pacific. The country also has five populated and nine unpopulated territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. At 3.79 million square miles (9.83 million km2) in total and with around 315 million people, the United States is the fourth-largest in total area, the fifth largest in the contiguous area and third in population.
Views: 899344 ArmedForcesUpdate
FUNNY Army Navy Military Fail Compilation
 
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A Funny Military Fail Compilation of Army and Navy videos. The military, also called the armed forces, are forces authorized to use deadly force, and weapons, to support the interests of the state and some or all of its citizens. The task of the military is usually defined as defense of the state and its citizens, and the prosecution of war against another state. The military may also have additional sanctioned and non-sanctioned functions within a society, including, the promotion of a political agenda, protecting corporate economic interests, internal population control, construction, emergency services, social ceremonies, and guarding important areas. The military can also function as a discrete subculture within a larger civil society, through the development of separate infrastructures, which may include housing, schools, utilities, food production and banking. The profession of soldiering as part of a military is older than recorded history itself. Some of the most enduring images of the classical antiquity portray the power and feats of its military leaders. The Battle of Kadesh in 1274 BC was one of the defining points of Pharaoh Ramesses II's reign and is celebrated in bas-relief on his monuments. A thousand years later the first emperor of unified China, Qin Shi Huang, was so determined to impress the gods with his military might that he was buried with an army of terracotta soldiers.[1] The Romans were dedicated to military matters, leaving to posterity many treatises and writings as well as a large number of lavishly carved triumphal arches and victory columns. Etymology and definitions[edit] Soldiers from the Canadian Grenadier Guards in the Kandahar Province of Afghanistan Issue: Possibly cognate with Thousand, cf. Latin and Romance language root word "mil-") The first recorded use of the word military in English, spelled militarie, was in 1585.[2] It comes from the Latin militaris (from Latin miles meaning "soldier") but is of uncertain etymology, one suggestion being derived from *mil-it- – going in a body or mass.[3][4] The word is now identified as denoting someone that is skilled in use of weapons, or engaged in military service or in warfare.[5][6] As a noun the military usually refers generally to a country's armed forces or sometimes, more specifically, to the senior officers who command them.[5][6] In general it refers to the physicality of armed forces, their personnel, equipment, and physical area which they occupy. As an adjective military originally referred only to soldiers and soldiering, but it soon broadened to apply to land forces in general and anything to do with their profession.[2] The names of both the Royal Military Academy (1741) and United States Military Academy (1802) reflect this. However, at about the time of the Napoleonic Wars, "military" began to be used in reference to armed forces as a whole[2] and in the 21st century expressions like "military service", "military intelligence" and "military history" encompass naval, marine and air force aspects. As such, it now connotes any activity performed by armed force personnel. History Military history is often considered to be the history of all conflicts, not just the history of the state militaries. It differs somewhat from the history of war with military history focusing on the people and institutions of war-making while the history of war focuses on the evolution of war itself in the face of changing technology, governments, and geography. Military history has a number of purposes. One main purpose is to learn from past accomplishments and mistakes so as to more effectively wage war in the future. Another is to create a sense of military tradition which is used to create cohesive military forces. Still another may be to learn to prevent wars more effectively. Human knowledge about the military is largely based on both recorded and oral history of military conflicts (war), their participating armies and navies and, more recently, air forces. There are two types of military history, although almost all texts have elements of both: descriptive history that serves to chronicle conflicts without offering any statements about the causes, nature of conduct, the ending and effects of a conflict; and analytical history that seeks to offer statements about the causes, nature, ending and aftermath of conflicts as a means of deriving knowledge and understanding of conflicts as a whole, and prevent repetition of mistakes in future, to suggest better concepts or methods in employing forces, or to advocate the need for new technology. Organization[edit] In the whole history of humanity, every nation had different needs for military forces. How these needs are determined forms the basis of their composition, equipment and use of facilities. It also determines what military does in terms of peacetime and wartime activities. All militaries, whether large or small, are military organizations that have official state
Views: 158903 ArmedForcesUpdate
Russian Military FUTURE RIFLE Kalashnikov  SR1 Low Recoil Carbine Assault Rifle
 
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A great video of new Russian military rifle technology. JSC Kalashnikov Concern (Russian: Концерн Калашникова, tr. Kontsern Kalashnikova; Izhevsk Machine-Building Plant until 2013; Russian: Ижевский машиностроительный Завод, tr. Izhevskiy mashinostroitel'nyy Zavod) or IZHMASH (ИЖМАШ)[6][7] is a Russian defense manufacturing concern and joint-stock company headquartered in the city of Izhevsk in the Republic of Udmurtia as well as the capital city of Moscow. The concern designs and produces a wide range civilian and military weapons including assault rifles, sniper rifles, designated marksman rifles, machine guns, squad automatic weapons, hunting rifles, shotguns, guided artillery projectiles, and a wide range of other precision weapons including unmanned vehicles and military robots.[8][9][10] Kalashnikov Concern produces about 95% of all small arms in Russia and supplies to more than 27 countries around the world, making it the largest firearm manufacturer in Russia. Notable products include the Kalashnikov (AK) assault rifle series, the RPK light machine gun series, the Dragunov SVD semi-automatic sniper rifle, the SKS semi-automatic carbine, the Makarov PM pistol, the Saiga-12 shotgun, and the submachine guns Vityaz-SN and PP-19 Bizon. These firearms, except for the SKS and the PM, were based out of the famous AK series, due to its reliability to endure harsh conditions, low production costs unlike Western firearms, availability in nearly every geographical region, and ease of use.[10][11] As of 2017, 51% of the Concern's shares belong to Rostec, while 49% of the company belongs to private investors (Alexey Krivoruchko, Andrei Bokarev and Nikolaos i. Panagogiannopoulos).[12] The Concern contains three firearm brands: "Kalashnikov" (combat and civilian weapons)", "Baikal" (hunting and civilian guns), and "Izhmash" (sporting rifles). The concern is developing new business lines that include remote weapon stations, unmanned aerial and ground vehicles, and multi-functional special-purpose boats.[13]
Views: 11409 ArmedForcesUpdate
AWESOME SOUND us navy F-18 take off and landing on aircraft carrier
 
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A great aircraft for the us navy the boeing F-18 super hornet. The Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet and related twin-seat F/A-18F are twin-engine carrier-based multirole fighter aircraft variants based on the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. The F/A-18E single-seat and F/A-18F tandem-seat variants are larger and more advanced derivatives of the F/A-18C and D Hornet. The Super Hornet has an internal 20 mm M61 rotary cannon and can carry air-to-air missiles and air-to-surface weapons. Additional fuel can be carried in up to five external fuel tanks and the aircraft can be configured as an airborne tanker by adding an external air refueling system. Designed and initially produced by McDonnell Douglas, the Super Hornet first flew in 1995. Full-rate production began in September 1997, after the merger of McDonnell Douglas and Boeing the previous month. The Super Hornet entered service with the United States Navy in 1999, replacing the Grumman F-14 Tomcat, which was retired in 2006, and serves alongside the original Hornet. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), which has operated the F/A-18A as its main fighter since 1984, ordered the F/A-18F in 2007 to replace its aging F-111 fleet. RAAF Super Hornets entered service in December 2010. Design Overview The Super Hornet is largely a new aircraft. It is about 20% larger, 7,000 lb (3,200 kg) heavier empty weight, and 15,000 lb (6,800 kg) heavier maximum weight than the original Hornet. The Super Hornet carries 33% more internal fuel, increasing mission range by 41% and endurance by 50% over the "Legacy" Hornet. The empty weight of the Super Hornet is about 11,000 lb (5,000 kg) less than that of the F-14 Tomcat which it replaced, while approaching, but not matching, the F-14's payload and range.[46][N 2] The Super Hornet, unlike the previous Hornet, is designed so it can be equipped with an aerial refueling system (ARS) or "buddy store" for the refueling of other aircraft,[47] filling the tactical airborne tanker role the Navy had lost with the retirement of the KA-6D and Lockheed S-3B Viking tankers. The ARS includes an external 330 US gal (1,200 L) tank with hose reel on the centerline, along with four external 480 US gal (1,800 L) tanks and internal tanks, for a total of 29,000 lb (13,000 kg) of fuel on the aircraft.[47][48] On typical missions a fifth of the air wing is dedicated to the tanker role, which consumes aircraft fatigue life expectancy faster than other missions.[49] Airframe changes The forward fuselage is unchanged, but the remainder of the aircraft shares little with earlier F/A-18C/D models. The fuselage was stretched by 34 in (86 cm) to make room for fuel and future avionics upgrades and increased the wing area by 25%.[50] However, the Super Hornet has 42% fewer structural parts than the original Hornet design.[51] The General Electric F414 engine, developed from the Hornet's F404, has 35% additional thrust over most of the aircraft's flight envelope.[50][52] The Super Hornet can return to an aircraft carrier with a larger load of unspent fuel and munitions than the original Hornet. The term for this ability is known as "bringback". Bringback for the Super Hornet is in excess of 9,000 lb (4,100 kg).[53] Other differences include approximately rectangular intakes for the engines and two extra wing hard points for payload (for a total of 11), retaining previous hardpoints on the bottom centerline, wingtips, and two conformal fuselage positions.[54] Among the most significant aerodynamic changes are the enlarged leading edge extensions (LEX) which provide improved vortex lifting characteristics in high angle of attack maneuvers, and reduce the static stability margin to enhance pitching characteristics. This results in pitch rates in excess of 40 degrees per second, and high resistance to departure from controlled flight.[55] Radar signature reduction measures Survivability is an important feature of the Super Hornet design. The U.S. Navy took a "balanced approach" to survivability in its design.[56] This means that it does not rely on low-observable technology, such as stealth systems, to the exclusion of other survivability factors. Instead, its design incorporates a combination of stealth, advanced electronic-warfare capabilities, reduced ballistic vulnerability, the use of standoff weapons, and innovative tactics that cumulatively and collectively enhance the safety of the fighter and crew.[57] The F/A-18E/F's radar cross-section was reduced greatly from some aspects, mainly the front and rear.[7] The design of the engine inlets reduces the aircraft's frontal radar cross-section. The alignment of the leading edges of the engine inlets is designed to scatter radiation to the sides. Fixed fanlike reflecting structures in the inlet tunnel divert radar energy away from the rotating fan blades.[58] The Super Hornet also makes considerable use of panel joint serration and edge alignment.
Views: 123643 ArmedForcesUpdate
REAL LIFE TOPGUN !!! US Air Force Elite Pilot Training Program
 
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A great video about US Air Force pilot training. The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven American uniformed services. Initially part of the United States Army, the USAF was formed as a separate branch of the military on 18 September 1947 under the National Security Act of 1947.[7] It is the most recent branch of the U.S. military to be formed, and is the largest and one of the world's most technologically advanced air forces. The USAF articulates its core functions as Nuclear Deterrence Operations, Special Operations, Air Superiority, Global Integrated ISR, Space Superiority, Command and Control, Cyberspace Superiority, Personnel Recovery, Global Precision Attack, Building Partnerships, Rapid Global Mobility and Agile Combat Support.[8] The U.S. Air Force is a military service organized within the Department of the Air Force, one of the three military departments of the Department of Defense. The Air Force is headed by the civilian Secretary of the Air Force, who reports to the Secretary of Defense, and is appointed by the President with Senate confirmation. The highest-ranking military officer in the Department of the Air Force is the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, who exercises supervision over Air Force units, and serves as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force combat and mobility forces are assigned, as directed by the Secretary of Defense, to the Combatant Commanders, and neither the Secretary of the Air Force nor the Chief of Staff have operational command authority over them. The U.S. Air Force provides air support for surface forces[9] and aids in the recovery of troops in the field. As of 2012, the service operates more than 5,638 military aircraft, 450 ICBMs and 63 military satellites. It has a $140 billion budget with 309,339 active duty personnel, 185,522 civilian personnel, 71,400 Air Force Reserve personnel, and 106,700 Air National Guard personnel.[4] Mission, vision, and functions[edit] Missions[edit] According to the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 502), which created the USAF: In general the United States Air Force shall include aviation forces both combat and service not otherwise assigned. It shall be organized, trained, and equipped primarily for prompt and sustained offensive and defensive air operations. The Air Force shall be responsible for the preparation of the air forces necessary for the effective prosecution of war except as otherwise assigned and, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the expansion of the peacetime components of the Air Force to meet the needs of war. §8062 of Title 10 US Code defines the purpose of the USAF as:[10] to preserve the peace and security, and provide for the defense, of the United States, the Territories, Commonwealths, and possessions, and any areas occupied by the United States; to support national policy; to implement national objectives; to overcome any nations responsible for aggressive acts that imperil the peace and security of the United States. The stated mission of the USAF today is to "fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace".[11 Vision[edit] "The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our sister services known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the joint mission first and foremost. We will provide compelling air, space, and cyber capabilities for use by the combatant commanders. We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the American people, while providing precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the nation".[11] Core functions[edit] Recently, the Air Force refined its understanding of the core duties and responsibilities it performs as a Military Service Branch, streamlining what previously were six distinctive capabilities and seventeen operational functions into twelve core functions to be used across the doctrine, organization, training, equipment, leadership, and education, personnel, and facilities spectrum. These core functions express the ways in which the Air Force is particularly and appropriately suited to contribute to national security, but they do not necessarily express every aspect of what the Air Force contributes to the nation. It should be emphasized that the core functions, by themselves, are not doctrinal constructs.[12] Nuclear Deterrence Operations[edit] The purpose of Nuclear Deterrence Operations (NDO) is to operate, maintain, and secure nuclear forces to achieve an assured capability to deter an adversary from taking action against vital US interests. In the event deterrence fails, the US should be able to appropriately respond with nuclear options. The sub-elements of this function are:[12] Assure/Dissuade/Deter is a mission set derived from the Air Force's readiness to carry out the nuclear strike operations
Views: 71893 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS FASTEST Propeller Driven Aircraft Tu-95 flying on mission
 
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The Tu-95 is the worlds fastest propeller driven aircraft in the world today. The Tupolev Tu-95 (Russian: Туполев Ту-95; NATO reporting name: "Bear") is a large, four-engine turboprop-powered strategic bomber and missile platform. First flown in 1952, the Tu-95 entered service with the Soviet Union in 1956 and is expected to serve the Russian Air Force until at least 2040.[1] A development of the bomber for maritime patrol is designated Tu-142, while a passenger airliner derivative was called Tu-114. The aircraft has four Kuznetsov NK-12 engines, each driving contra-rotating propellers. It is the only propeller-powered strategic bomber still in operational use today. The tips of the propeller-blades move faster than the speed of sound, making it one of the noisiest military aircraft.[2] Its distinctive swept-back wings are at a 35° angle. Design and development[edit] A Tu-95MS in 2007. A Tu-95 showing its swept wing and anti-shock bodies The design bureau led by Andrei Tupolev designed the Soviet Union's first intercontinental bomber, the 1949 Tu-85, a scaled up version of the Tu-4, a Boeing B-29 Superfortress copy.[3] A new requirement was issued to both Tupolev and Myasishchev design bureaus in 1950: the proposed bomber had to have an un-refueled range of 8,000 km (4,970 mi)—far enough to threaten key targets in the United States. Other goals included the ability to carry an 11,000 kg (12.1 ton) load over the target.[citation needed] The big problem for Tupolev was the engine choice: the Tu-4 showed that piston engines were not powerful enough to fulfill that role, while the fuel-hungry AM-3 jet engines of the proposed T-4 intercontinental jet bomber did not provide adequate range.[4] Turboprops offered more power than the piston engines and better range than jets available for the new bomber's development at the time, while offering a top speed in between these two alternative choices. Tupolev's proposal was selected and Tu-95 development was officially approved by the government on 11 July 1951. It featured four Kuznetsov[5] coupled turboprops, each fitted with two contra-rotating propellers of four blades each, producing a nominal 8,948 kW (12,000 eshp) power rating. The then-advanced engine was designed by a German team of ex-Junkers prisoner-engineers under Ferdinand Brandner. In contrast, the fuselage was conventional: a mid-wing cantilever monoplane with 35 degrees of sweep, an angle which ensured the main wing spar passed through the fuselage in front of the bomb bay. Retractable tricycle landing gear was fitted, with all three gear strut units retracting rearwards, with the main gear units retracting rearwards into extensions of the inner engine nacelles.[citation needed] The Tu-95/I, with 2TV-2F engines, first flew in November 1952 with test pilot Alexey Perelet at the controls.[6] After six months of test flights this aircraft suffered a propeller gearbox failure and crashed, killing Perelet. The second aircraft, Tu-95/II featured four of the 12,000 ehp Kuznetsov NK-12 turboprops which proved more reliable than the coupled 2TV-2F. After a successful flight testing phase, series production of the Tu-95 started in January 1956.[5] A Tu-95MS simulating aerial refueling with an Ilyushin Il-78 during the Victory Day Parade in Moscow on 9 May 2008. For a long time, the Tu-95 was known to U.S./NATO intelligence as the Tu-20. While this was the original Soviet Air Force designation for the aircraft, by the time it was being supplied to operational units it was already better known under the Tu-95 designation used internally by Tupolev, and the Tu-20 designation quickly fell out of use in the USSR.[citation needed] Since the Tu-20 designation was used on many documents acquired by U.S. intelligence agents, the name continued to be used outside the Soviet Union.[citation needed] Initially the United States Department of Defense evaluated the Tu-95 as having a maximum speed of 644 km/h (400 mph) with a range of 12,500 km (7,800 mi).[7] These numbers had to be revised upward numerous times.[citation needed] Like its American counterpart, the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, the Tu-95 has continued to operate in the Russian Air Force while several subsequent iterations of bomber design have come and gone. Part of the reason for this longevity was its suitability, like the B-52, for modification to different missions. Whereas the Tu-95 was originally intended to drop free-falling nuclear weapons, it was subsequently modified to perform a wide range of roles, such as the deployment of cruise missiles, maritime patrol (Tu-142), and even civilian airliner (Tu-114). An AWACS platform (Tu-126) was developed from the Tu-114. An icon of the Cold War, the Tu-95 has served not only as a weapons platform but as a symbol of Soviet and later Russian national prestige. Russia’s air force has received the first examples of a number of modernised strategic bombers Tu-95MSs following upgrade work.
Views: 1241967 ArmedForcesUpdate
RARE & EXOTIC US Air Force Aircraft on display at Aviation Museum
 
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The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven American uniformed services. Initially part of the United States Army, the USAF was formed as a separate branch of the military on 18 September 1947 under the National Security Act of 1947.[5] It is the most recent branch of the U.S. military to be formed, and is the largest and one of the world's most technologically advanced air forces. The USAF articulates its core functions as Nuclear Deterrence Operations, Special Operations, Air Superiority, Global Integrated ISR, Space Superiority, Command and Control, Cyberspace Superiority, Personnel Recovery, Global Precision Attack, Building Partnerships, Rapid Global Mobility and Agile Combat Support.[6] The U.S. Air Force is a military service within the Department of the Air Force, one of the three military departments of the Department of Defense. The USAF is headed by the civilian Secretary of the Air Force, who is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The highest-ranking military officer in the Department of the Air Force is the Chief of Staff of the Air Force who exercises supervision over Air Force units, and serves as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force combat forces and mobility forces are assigned, as directed by the Secretary of Defense, to the Combatant Commanders, and neither the Secretary of the Air Force nor the Chief of Staff have operational command authority over them. The U.S. Air Force provides air support for surface forces[7] and aids in the recovery of troops in the field. As of 2012, the service operates more than 5,638 aircraft, 450 ICBMs and 63 satellites. It has a $140 billion budget with 332,854 active duty personnel, 185,522 civilian personnel, 71,400 Air Force Reserve personnel, and 106,700 Air National Guard personnel.[2] Mission, vision, and functions[edit] Missions[edit] According to the National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 502), which created the USAF: In general the United States Air Force shall include aviation forces both combat and service not otherwise assigned. It shall be organized, trained, and equipped primarily for prompt and sustained offensive and defensive air operations. The Air Force shall be responsible for the preparation of the air forces necessary for the effective prosecution of war except as otherwise assigned and, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the expansion of the peacetime components of the Air Force to meet the needs of war. §8062 of Title 10 US Code defines the purpose of the USAF as:[8] to preserve the peace and security, and provide for the defense, of the United States, the Territories, Commonwealths, and possessions, and any areas occupied by the United States; to support national policy; to implement national objectives; to overcome any nations responsible for aggressive acts that imperil the peace and security of the United States. The stated mission of the USAF today is to "fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace".[9] Vision[edit] "The United States Air Force will be a trusted and reliable joint partner with our sister services known for integrity in all of our activities, including supporting the joint mission first and foremost. We will provide compelling air, space, and cyber capabilities for use by the combatant commanders. We will excel as stewards of all Air Force resources in service to the American people, while providing precise and reliable Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the nation".[9] Core functions[edit] Recently, the Air Force refined its understanding of the core duties and responsibilities it performs as a Military Service Branch, streamlining what previously were six distinctive capabilities and seventeen operational functions into twelve core functions to be used across the doctrine, organization, training, equipment, leadership, and education, personnel, and facilities spectrum. These core functions express the ways in which the Air Force is particularly and appropriately suited to contribute to national security, but they do not necessarily express every aspect of what the Air Force contributes to the nation. It should be emphasized that the core functions, by themselves, are not doctrinal constructs.[10] Air Superiority Air Superiority is "that degree of dominance in the air battle of one force over another which permits the conduct of operations by the former and its related land, sea, air, and special operations forces at a given time and place without prohibitive interference by the opposing force" (JP 1-02).[10] First F-35 Lightning II of the 33rd Fighter Wing arrives at Eglin AFB Offensive Counterair (OCA) is defined as "offensive operations to destroy, disrupt, or neutralize enemy aircraft, missiles,
Views: 62685 ArmedForcesUpdate
RARE VIDEO US made F-14 flying with Tu-160, Tu-95 & Tu-22M Aircraft
 
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Awesome video of US made F-14 flying with Tu-160, Tu-95 & Tu-22M Strategic Aircraft. The Tupolev Tu-160 Beliy Lebed (or White Swan,[1] Russian: Туполев Ту-160, NATO reporting name: Blackjack) is a supersonic, variable-sweep wing heavy strategic bomber designed by the Tupolev Design Bureau in the Soviet Union. Although several civil and military transport aircraft are larger in overall dimensions, the Tu-160 is the world's largest combat aircraft, largest supersonic aircraft and largest variable-sweep aircraft built. Entering service in 1987, the Tu-160 was the last strategic bomber designed for the Soviet Union. The Long Range Aviation branch of the Russian Air Force has 16 aircraft with fewer in active use. The Tu-160 active fleet has been undergoing upgrades to electronics systems since the early 2000s. The Tu-160M modernisation programme has begun with the first new updated aircraft delivered in December 2014. Development[edit] Origins[edit] The first competition for a supersonic strategic heavy bomber was launched in the Soviet Union in 1967. In 1972, the Soviet Union launched a new multi-mission bomber competition to create a new supersonic, variable-geometry ("swing-wing") heavy bomber with a maximum speed of Mach 2.3, in response to the US Air Force B-1 bomber project. The Tupolev design, dubbed Aircraft 160M, with a lengthened blended wing layout and incorporating some elements of the Tu-144, competed against the Myasishchev M-18 and the Sukhoi T-4 designs.[2] Tu-160 in flight Work on the new Soviet bomber continued despite an end to the B-1A and in the same year, the design was accepted by the government committee. The prototype was photographed by an airline passenger at a Zhukovsky Airfield in November 1981, about a month before the aircraft's first flight on 18 December 1981. Production was authorized in 1984, beginning at Kazan Aircraft Production Association.[3] Modernization[edit] Like many Soviet weapon systems, the Tu-160 struggled to overcome unreliable components and a lack of maintenance during the 1990s.[citation needed] The original systems were faulty and required major rework using up-to-date computer chip and circuit boards.[citation needed] The modernised aircraft were then accepted into Russian service again after testing in late 2005.[4][5] The upgrade also integrated the ability to launch two new conventional versions of the long-range Kh-55 nuclear cruise missile—the Kh-101 and Kh-555.[6][7][8] Although Russia has overstated the progress of the modernisation project, it seems that the project has been restricted by the lack of up-to-date facilities to keep aircraft flying.[citation needed] This resulted in the delivery of a new-build aircraft but the "first modernised Tu-160" in July 2006 did not receive new avionics, although they were planned for the new airframe.[5][9][10] The modernisation appears to be split into two phases, concentrating on life extension with some initial communication–navigation updates, followed by 10 aircraft receiving new engines and capability upgrades after 2016.[4] The first refitted aircraft was delivered to the VVS in May 2008; a follow-up contract to overhaul three aircraft in 2013 cost RUR3.4 billion (US$103m).[11] The first updated M-model Tu-160 was delivered in December 2014.[12][13][14] Although the phase I update was due to be completed by 2016, industrial limitations may delay it to 2019 or beyond.[15] Although Kuznetsov designed an NK-32M engine with improved reliability over the troublesome NK-32 engines, its successor company has struggled to deliver working units. Metallist-Samara JSC had not produced new engines for a decade when it was given a contract in 2011 to overhaul 26 of the existing engines, by two years later, only four were finished.[15] Ownership and financial concerns hinder the prospects of a new production line; the firm insists it needs a minimum of 20 engines ordered per year but the government is only prepared to pay for 4–6 engines per year.[15][16] A further improved engine has been bench tested and may enter production in 2016 or later.[4] On 29 April 2015, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu was quoted as saying that Russia was resuming production of the Tu-160.[17][18] On 28 May 2015 the Russian news agency TASS: Russia reported that the Russian Air Force will purchase at least 50 new-build Tu-160s and that production of the aircraft will restart at the Kazan aviation plant.[19] General Viktor Bondarev has said that development of the PAK DA will continue alongside resumption of production of the older model bomber.[20]
Views: 165368 ArmedForcesUpdate
Russian air force Yakovlev Yak 130 AWESOME AIR COMBAT pilot trainer
 
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Great aircraft for the Russian air force. The Yakovlev Yak-130 (NATO reporting name: Mitten[3]) is a subsonic two-seat advanced jet trainer/light attack aircraft or lead-in fighter trainer developed by Yakovlev and Aermacchi. Development of the plane began in 1991, and the maiden flight was conducted on 26 April 1996. In 2005, it won a Russian government tender for training aircraft, and in 2009 the first planes entered service with the Russian Air Force. As an advanced training aircraft, the Yak-130 is able to replicate the characteristics of several 4+ generation fighters as well as the fifth-generation Sukhoi T-50. It can also perform light-attack and reconnaissance duties, carrying a combat load of 3,000 kg. The Sukhoi Su-35 (Russian: Сухой Су-35; NATO reporting name: Flanker-E) is a designation for two separate heavily-upgraded derivatives of the Su-27 'Flanker'. They are single-seat, twin-engine supermaneuverable multirole fighters, designed by Sukhoi and built by Komsomolsk-on-Amur Aircraft Production Association (KnAAPO). The first variant was designed during the 1980s, when Sukhoi was looking to upgrade its high-performance Su-27, and was initially known as the Su-27M. Later re-designated Su-35, this derivative incorporates aerodynamic refinements to increase manoeuvrability, enhanced avionics, longer range, and a more powerful engine. The first Su-35 prototype, converted from a Su-27, made its maiden flight in June 1988. More than a dozen of these were built with some used by the Russian Knights aerobatic demonstration team. The first Su-35 design was later modified into the Su-37 with thrust-vectoring engines and used as a technology demonstrator. A sole Su-35UB two-seat trainer was built in the late 1990s that, despite its name, shares a strong resemblance to the Su-30MK family. Russia Listeni/ˈrʌʃə/ or /ˈrʊʃə/ (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya; IPA: [rɐˈsʲijə] ( listen)), also officially known as the Russian Federation[10] (Russian: Российская Федерация, tr. Rossiyskaya Federatsiya; IPA: [rɐˈsʲijskəjə fʲɪdʲɪˈrat͡sɨjə] ( listen)), is a country in northern Eurasia.[11] It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk, and the US state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At 17,075,400 square kilometres (6,592,800 sq mi), Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012.[12] Extending across the whole of northern Asia and much of Europe, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms.
Views: 396229 ArmedForcesUpdate
IMPRESSIVE German Military OFF ROAD Infantry Combat Vehicle
 
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A great video of the impressive German military SPz Puma off road combat military vehicle. The Puma is a German infantry fighting vehicle (Schützenpanzer or short SPz) designed to replace the aging Marder IFVs currently in service with the Bundeswehr. Replacement began in 2010 and is scheduled for completion by 2020. Mass production began on 6 July 2009.[3] The company responsible for the project is PSM Projekt System Management, a joint venture of Krauss-Maffei Wegmann and Rheinmetall Landsysteme. The Puma is one of the best-protected IFVs, while still having a high power-to-weight ratio. SAIC offered a derivative of the Puma as its contender in the American GCV Infantry Fighting Vehicle program.[4] Design The Puma, while externally not very different from existing IFVs, incorporates a number of advances and state-of-the-art technologies. The most obvious of these is the incorporated ability to flexibly mount different armour (see below for details). Another feature is the compact, one-piece crew cabin that enables direct crew interaction ("face-to-face"; like replacing the driver or gunner in case of a medical emergency) and minimizes the protected volume. The cabin is air conditioned, NBC-proof with internal nuclear and chemical sensors and has a fire suppressing system using non-toxic agents. The engine compartment has its own fire extinguishing system. The only compromise of the otherwise nearly cuboid cabin is the driver station, located in a protrusion in front of the gunner, in front of the turret. One measure to achieve the one-piece cabin is the use of an unmanned, double-asymmetrical turret (see photo): while slightly off-center turrets are common in IFVs, the Puma's turret is on the left-hand side of the vehicle, while the main cannon is mounted on the right side of the turret and thus on the middle axis of the hull when the turret is in the forward position. The outer hull (minus the turret) is very smooth and low to minimize bullet traps and the general visual signature. The whole combat-ready vehicle in its base configuration will be air transportable in the Airbus A400M tactical airlifter. Its 3+6 persons crew capability is comparable to other vehicles of comparable weight like the US American M2 Bradley IFV, the same as in the Marder, but smaller than the 3+8 of the CV9030 and CV9035. Armament The primary armament is a Rheinmetall 30 mm MK 30-2/ABM (Air Burst Munitions) autocannon, which has a rate of fire of 200 rounds per minute and an effective range of 3,000 m. The smaller 30 x 173 mm caliber offers major weight saving advantages for example in comparison to the Bofors 40 mm gun mounted on the CV9040 because of a much lower ammunition size and weight. The belt-feeding also gives a large number of rounds ready to fire, while the 40mm offers only 24 shots per magazine. This is not a problem in a CV9040, but would force the Puma off the battlefield to reload the unmanned turret. There are currently two ammunition types directly available via the autocannon's dual ammunition feed. One is a sub-calibre, fin-stabilised APFSDS-T (T for tracer), with high penetration capabilities, mainly for use against medium armoured vehicles. The second is a full-calibre, multi-purpose, Kinetic Energy-Timed Fuse (KETF) munition, designed with the air burst capability (depending on the fuse setting) for ejecting a cone of sub-munitions. The ammunition type can be chosen on a shot to shot basis, as the weapon fires from an open bolt, meaning no cartridge is inserted until the trigger is depressed. The ammunition capacity is 400 rounds; 200 ready to fire and 200 in storage. Keeping the weight within the 35ton limit also led to a smaller calibre for the secondary armament, a coaxially mounted 5.56 mm HK MG4 machine gun firing at 850 rounds per minute and with an effective range of 1,000 m. The ammunition capacity is 2,000 rounds; 1,000 ready to fire and 1,000 in storage. While this is a smaller weapon than the western standard secondary armament (7.62 mm caliber MG), it offers the advantage that the crew can use the ammunition in their individual firearms. In situations where the lower range and penetration of the 5.56 mm rounds is an issue, the high ammunition load of the main gun enables the vehicle crew to use one or two main gun rounds instead. The gun housing can also host the 7.62 mm MG3. To combat main battle tanks, helicopters and infrastructure targets, such as bunkers, the German Puma vehicles will be equipped with a turret-mounted EuroSpike Spike LR missile launcher, which carries two missiles.[9] The Spike LR missile has an effective range up to 4,000 m and can be launched in either the "Fire and Forget" or "Fire and Observe" mode. In addition to the usual smoke-grenade launchers with 8 shots, there is a 6-shot 76 mm launcher at the back of the vehicle for close-in defence. The main back door can be opened halfway and enables two of the passengers to scout and shoot from moderate protection.
Views: 66746 ArmedForcesUpdate
WORLDS MOST FEARED !!! Latvian Military Elite Soldiers Documentary
 
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An interesting Documentary about NATO military Latvian Elite Soldiers. FORT BRAGG, N.C. - Forty-one Soldiers from the 18th Field Artillery Brigade assembled at the Fort Bragg Training Support Center to kick start the Steel First Responder Program that began on Feb. 29 and ended March 4. The “Steel” Brigade seeks to increase each Soldiers’ first aid capabilities to ensure better and quicker medical attention during future missions. High Mobility Artillery Rocket System crews and other brigade personnel often operate in austere environments, making it essential that Soldiers are trained at the highest level possible to provide quality first aid to each other during medical emergencies. First Lt. Christopher Childs, the brigade medical officer, oversaw the weeklong training event. “We wanted to give Soldiers a more in-depth look at the Combat Lifesaver program and give them the confidence and abilities to operate in isolated environments,” said Childs. “As a HIMARS brigade, when the launchers go out, they’re typically alone and a good distance away from medics. To minimize the Golden Hour, the initial hour to effectively treat a casualty, which is proven to save lives, you want to give your first line responders the greatest chance, within their scope of training, to save lives.” “For this being the first SFRP, there was nothing but positive reaction, not only from the students, but also the cadre,” added Childs. “Some of the students have said this has been the best medical training they’ve received on the CLS level.” Students were taught a wide variety of first aid and combat casualty care, including the use of tourniquets, opening air ways, treating open chest wounds and missing limbs, and methods to carrying a casualty. Spc. Jordan Morales, a medic with the 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment, taught a number of the classes as well as the practical exercises during SFRP. “My goal during SFPR was to teach the students CLS and basic Tactical Combat Casualty Care,” said Morales. “We definitely hit our mark at the end of the evaluations and everyone passed. They all did well in the lanes and got their CPR certificates. At the end of the class during our after-action-review, a lot of the students said this was the most in depth CLS class they had ever taken before.” “All of the Soldiers were really enthusiastic to be in the training,” continued Morales. “We put them in a stressful environment and made them move with a purpose, but slow is smooth and smooth is fast. It was very successful. This is the most fun CLS class I’ve ever taught.” Treating combat wounds wasn’t the only thing the students were taught. The Soldiers learned how to continue to care for casualties while reacting to direct and indirect fire and transporting a casualty through a hostile environment. Sgt. Brittany Johnston, a gunner in Able Battery, 3rd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment, completed the course as one of the top three students. “A lot of training can be drawn out and have spare time throughout it, but this training was the perfect amount of time,” said Johnston. “Everything we were taught was valuable and I personally liked the IV training and CPR, which is something I’ve never learned before. It was pretty good training.” “I feel like with this training I would be able to react quicker to a situation,” added Johnston. “I’m a lot more confident now and we were well prepared for everything we were evaluated on. The evaluation lanes were very well organized and in-depth and more realistic than I’ve experienced before.” Video Description Credit: Sgt. Benjamin Parsons Video Credit: NATO Channel Video Thumbnail Credit: Gregory Gieske Attribution 2.0 Generic licence link: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Photo modified by ArmedForcesUpdate
Views: 75113 ArmedForcesUpdate
Electromagnetic Catapult System for US NAVY aircraft carriers
 
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A great idea for US navy aircraft carriers. An aircraft carrier is a warship with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, rescuing and recovering aircraft, acting as a seagoing airbase.[1] It is typically the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project airpower worldwide without having to depend on local bases for staging aircraft operations, and is extremely expensive to build and important to protect. The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is a system under development by the United States Navy to launch carrier-based aircraft from catapults using a linear motor drive instead of conventional steam pistons. This technology reduces stress on airframes because they can be accelerated more gradually to takeoff speed than with steam-powered catapults. Other advantages includes lower system weight, cost, and maintenance; the ability to launch both heavier and lighter aircraft than conventional systems; and lower requirements for fresh water, reducing the need for energy-intensive desalination. Design and development[edit] The EMALS is being developed by General Atomics for the U.S. Navy's newest Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers. In June 2010, the land-based prototype of the system passed initial tests, with the first aircraft launch from the system taking place at the end of 2010.[1] Linear induction motor[edit] The EMALS uses a linear induction motor (LIM), which uses electric currents to generate magnetic fields that propel a carriage down a track to launch the aircraft.[2] The EMALS consists of four main elements:[3] The linear induction motor consists of a row of stator coils that have the function of a conventional motor's armature. When energized, the motor accelerates the carriage down the track. Only the section of the coils surrounding the carriage is energized at any given time, thereby minimizing reactive losses. The EMALS' 300-foot (91 m) LIM will accelerate a 100,000-pound (45,000 kg) aircraft to 130 knots (240 km/h).[2] Energy storage subsystem[edit] The induction motor requires a large amount of electric energy in just a few seconds—more than the ship's own power source can provide. The EMALS energy-storage subsystem draws power from the ship and stores it kinetically on rotors of four disk alternators.[4] Each rotor can store more than 100 megajoules, and can be recharged within 45 seconds of a launch, faster than steam catapults.[2] Power conversion subsystem[edit] During launch, the power conversion subsystem releases the stored energy from the disk alternators using a cycloconverter.[2] The cycloconverter provides a controlled rising frequency and voltage to the LIM, energizing only the small portion of stator coils that affect the launch carriage at any given moment.[4] Control consoles[edit] Operators control the power through a closed loop system. Hall effect sensors on the track monitor its operation, allowing the system to ensure that it provides the desired acceleration. The closed loop system allows the EMALS to maintain a constant tow force, which helps reduce the launch stresses on the plane's airframe.[2] Compared to steam catapults, EMALS weighs less, occupies less space, requires less maintenance and manpower, is more reliable, and uses less energy. Steam catapults, which use about 614 kilograms of steam per launch, have extensive mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic subsystems.[4] EMALS uses no steam, which makes it suitable for the Navy's planned all-electric ships.[12] The EMALS could be more easily incorporated into a ramp.[4] Compared to steam catapults, EMALS can control the launch performance with greater precision, allowing it to launch more kinds of aircraft, from heavy fighter jets to light unmanned aircraft.[12] EMALS can also deliver 29 percent more energy than steam's approximately 95 megajoules, increasing the output to 122 megajoules.[4] The EMALS will also be more efficient than the 5-percent efficiency of steam catapults.[2] Program status[edit] The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System at Naval Air Systems Command, Lakehurst, launching a United States Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet during a test on 18 December 20101--2 June 2010: Successful launch of a T-45 Goshawk at Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst.[5] 9--10 June 2010: Successful launch of a C-2 Greyhound at Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst.[6] 18 December 2010: Successful launch of a F/A-18E Super Hornet at Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst.[7][8] 27 September 2011: Successful launch of an E-2D Advanced Hawkeye at Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst.[9][10] 18 November 2011: Successful launch of a F-35C Lightning II.[11] EMALS is a design feature of the Ford-class carrier.[13] Converteam UK were working on an electro-magnetic catapult (EMCAT) system for the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier.[14] In August 2009, speculation mounted that the UK may drop the STOVL
Views: 23214 ArmedForcesUpdate
US Military MOST FEARED sniper uses M110 SASS rifle
 
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Another gert US Military video The M110 Semi Automatic Sniper System (M110 SASS) is an American semi-automatic sniper rifle/designated marksman rifle that is chambered for the 7.62×51mm NATO round, developed by U.S. firearm manufacturer Knight's Armament Company. The M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System is intended to replace the M24 Sniper Weapon System used by snipers, spotters, designated marksman, or squad advanced marksmen in the United States Army. However, the U.S. Army still acquired M24s from Remington until February 2010.[2] After witnessing the effects of USSOCOM snipers and extensive after-action reports from SOF snipers throughout the Iraqi theater of operations, the U.S. Army ran a competition involving several designs, including rifles from Knight's Armament Company, Remington, and DPMS Panther Arms.[citation needed] On September 28, 2005, the Knight's Armament Co. rifle won the competition and was selected to be the supplier of the M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper System. The XM110 underwent final operational testing in May and June of 2007 at Fort Drum, New York by a mix of Special Forces troops and Sniper trained soldiers from the 10th Mountain Division. In April 2008, U.S. Army soldiers from Task Force Fury in Afghanistan were the first in a combat zone to receive the M110. The troops rated the weapon very highly, noting the quality of the weapon and its semi-automatic capabilities compared to the bolt-action M24. The United States Marine Corps will also be adopting the M110 to replace some M39 and all Mk 11 as a complement to the M40A5.[3] It is manufactured by Knight's Armament Company in Titusville, Florida, though the complete system incorporates a Leupold 3.5–10× variable power daytime optic, Harris swivel bipod, AN/PVS-26 or AN/PVS-10 night sight and PALs magazine pouches of yet unpublished origin.[citation needed] The rifle has ambidextrous features such as a double-sided magazine release, safety selector switch, and bolt catch. Design[edit] The rifle is similar to the SR-25/Mk 11 Mod 0, but differs significantly in buttstock and rail system design. The SR-25, Mk 11 Mod 0, and M110 are based loosely on the original AR-10 developed by Eugene Stoner but feature additional refinements instituted by KAC to maximize parts commonality with the AR-15 design, improve weapon reliability, and increase accuracy. The main differences between the Mk 11 and M110 are improvements suggested by a user group meeting between NAVSPECWAR, USASOC and USA in 2007: The rail system used: the KAC Free Floated RAS on the Mk 11 is replaced by a URX modular rail system with integral folding front 600-meter back-up iron sight. The M110 buttstock: fixed, though the buttplate is adjustable for length of pull to match user preferences. Adjustment can be made without tools via a notched hand-tightened knob on the right-hand side of the stock. This feature was added during the change from XM110 to M110. The fixed buttstock also features integral quick-detachable sling swivel sockets located on each side of the stock near the rear of the lower receiver. The addition of a flash hider to the barrel of the M110, which also necessitates a modified QD Suppressor unit similar to that on the Mk 11. The M110's use of KAC's one-piece 30 mm scope mount instead of two separate scope rings. On June 12, 2008, the M110 was ranked #2 on the U.S. Army's top ten inventions of 2007.[4] According to performance specification (MIL-PRF-32316 (AR) w/AMENDMENT 1, 5 October 2009): 3.4.1.1.1 Accuracy. The distance between the mean point of impact of each shot group, both unsuppressed and suppressed, shall be not greater than 1.1 inches at 300 feet. 3.4.1.1.2 Dispersion. The average mean radius (AMR) (see 6.11), of each shot group shall be not greater than to 0.68 inches at 300 feet. All targets shall be fired on using M118LR ammunition or equivalent, using five (5) round groups.
Views: 483778 ArmedForcesUpdate
OLD BUT POWERFUL Romanian military T-85 Main Battle Tank
 
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The TR-85 is a main battle tank designed for the armed forces of Romania. Based on the TR-77-580 (Romanian-built version of the Soviet T-55 tank), the TR-85 tank was developed from 1978 to 1985 and produced from 1986 until 1990. A modernization program was initiated in March 1994 in order to upgrade the TR-85 tanks to NATO standards. The result was the TR-85M1 main battle tank, currently the most modern tank in service with the Romanian Land Forces. Although a further development of the T-55, the TR-85M1 uses a T-block powerpack (similar to the one used in the Leopard 1) based on a V8 German 830 hp diesel engine, an improved turret, a locally-designed "Ciclop" fire control system (with cross-wind sensor, laser rangefinder and night vision), new 100 mm BM-412 Sg APFSDS-T projectiles and a completely redesigned suspension with 6 road wheels on each side, protected by metal side skirts. Combat weight is 50 tons. Modernization program[edit] In March 1994, the Romanian General Staff initiated the modernization program of the TR-85 tanks by order no. 1429. On 14 April 1994, the upgrade program was approved by the Supreme Council of National Defense and development of the new tank, officially designated TR-85M1 Bizonul (The Bison), started in 1996 when two prototypes were built.[5] The aim of the program was to upgrade the TR-85 to NATO standards by improving the firepower, protection, mobility, the communication systems and the reliability of the engine, transmission and the braking system.[6] The modernization program involved both foreign companies (most of them from France), such as Aerospatiale Matra, Sagem, Kollmorgen-Artus, Racal, and local defense companies such as the ROMARM military consortium, METRA (Military Equipment and Technologies Research Agency), Electromagnetica, FAUR, Elprof, Aeroteh, IOR, Prooptica, Artego, Arsenal Reşiţa, Metav, Forsev, Anticorozivul, IEMI, Rolast, Aerostar and IOEL. The result of the modernization program, the TR-85M1 tank, is compliant with NATO standards.[5] Armament The main armament of the TR-85M1 is the 100 mm A308 rifled tank gun (an adaptation of the M1977 towed anti-tank gun made by Arsenal Reşiţa) that was also fitted to the TR-77 tanks.[9] The TR-85M1 has a rate of fire of about 4-7 rounds per minute and can carry up to 41 projectiles inside the tank. The gun barrel is fitted with a bore evacuator and has a thermal sleeve. The TR-85 tanks use a manual loader. The modernized version has a number of improvements to increase the reliability of the gun. The hydraulic buffer was improved by replacing the rubber sealing and the electroerosion of the crome layer from the hydraulic buffer and recuperator has been removed by changing the design and manufacturing process.[8] The gun can fire APFSDS-T (BM-421 Sg), shaped charge (BK-412R and BK-5M), high explosive (OF-412), armour piercing with tracer (ballistic-capped BR-412B and BR-412D) and target practice (PBR-412 and PBR-421B) rounds. There was also an APFSDS round that is no longer in production.[10] In order to increase the firepower of the TR-85 tank, the BM-421 Sg round (known internationally as the M309 cartridge) was developed in cooperation with Israel as part of the modernization program started in 1996.[10] Made by Aeroteh SA from Bucharest and marketed by ROMARM SA, the BM-421 Sg projectile can penetrate 444 mm of RHAe at 90° at 500 meters, 425 mm at 1000 meters and 328 mm at 4000 meters.[11] Secondary armament The TR-85M1 tank has two machine guns: A 12.7x108mm DShKM heavy machine gun in a pintle mount on the loader's hatch ring. The DShK machine gun is made by UM Cugir and can be used as a light antiaircraft weapon. To fire and reload the weapon manually, the gunner has to partially expose himself to suppressive fire. A 7.62x54mmR PKM machine gun (also made by UM Cugir as the armoured vehicle machine gun version of the md. 66 machine gun[12]) in a coaxial mount to the right of the main gun. The coaxial MG is aimed and fired with the same computer fire control system (Ciclop) used for the main gun. Aiming[edit] The TR-85M1 is equipped with the local-made Ciclop-M (Cyclops-M, M stands for Modernized) ballistic fire-control computer, a third generation FCS and an improvement of the previous, second generation, Ciclop FCS (used on the TR-85 version and equipped with an Intel 8080 microprocessor, 1 ko of RAM and 12 ko of system memory). According to the manual of the Ciclop-M fire control system, the ballistic solution generated ensures a hit percentage greater than 95% for a target under 2000 meters and greater than 75% for a target between 2000 and 3000 meters.[13] Also, the Ciclop-M can be used to aim a target located at up to 6 km away with the OF-421 high explosive round, up to 5 km away for the BM-421 Sg APFSDS-T round, 4 km for the AP-T rounds and up to 3 km for the HEAT projectiles. The coaxial machine gun can be aimed at a maximum distance of 2 km using the FCS of the tank.
Views: 64221 ArmedForcesUpdate
THIS CAN'T BE SAFE us military V-22 Osprey aircraft refueling
 
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An interesting video of US Military conducting refueling operations of their Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey aircraft. The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is an American multi-mission, military, tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability. It is designed to combine the functionality of a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. The V-22 originated from the United States Department of Defense Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft program started in 1981. The team of Bell Helicopter and Boeing Helicopters was awarded a development contract in 1983 for the tiltrotor aircraft. The Bell Boeing team jointly produce the aircraft.[4] The V-22 first flew in 1989, and began flight testing and design alterations; the complexity and difficulties of being the first tiltrotor intended for military service in the world led to many years of development. The United States Marine Corps began crew training for the Osprey in 2000, and fielded it in 2007; it supplemented and then replaced their Boeing Vertol CH-46 Sea Knights. The Osprey's other operator, the U.S. Air Force, fielded their version of the tiltrotor in 2009. Since entering service with the U.S. Marine Corps and Air Force, the Osprey has been deployed in both combat and rescue operations over Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and Libya. Role V/STOL transport National origin United States Manufacturer Bell Helicopter Boeing Rotorcraft Systems First flight 19 March 1989 Introduction 13 June 2007[1] Status In service Primary users United States Marine Corps United States Air Force Produced 1988–present Number built 200+ as of 2014[2] Program cost US$35.6 billion after planned procurement of 408 aircraft[3] Unit cost MV-22: US$69.3 million (flyaway cost for FY2012)[3] Developed from Bell XV-15 Design Overview The Osprey is the world's first production tiltrotor aircraft, with one three-bladed proprotor, turboprop engine, and transmission nacelle mounted on each wingtip. It is classified as a powered lift aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration.[84] For takeoff and landing, it typically operates as a helicopter with the nacelles vertical and rotors horizontal. Once airborne, the nacelles rotate forward 90° in as little as 12 seconds for horizontal flight, converting the V-22 to a more fuel-efficient, higher speed turboprop aircraft. STOL rolling-takeoff and landing capability is achieved by having the nacelles tilted forward up to 45°.[85][86] Other orientations are possible, such as the "80 Jump" takeoff which uses nacelles at 80° to quickly achieve high altitude and speed.[87] Composite materials make up 43% of the airframe, and the proprotor blades also use composites.[85] For storage, the V-22's rotors fold in 90 seconds and its wing rotates to align, front-to-back, with the fuselage.[88] Due to the requirement for folding rotors, their 38-foot diameter is 5 feet less than optimal for vertical takeoff, resulting in high disk loading.[87] Most missions use fixed wing flight 75% or more of the time, reducing wear and tear and operational costs. This fixed wing flight is higher than typical helicopter missions allowing longer range line-of-sight communications for improved command and control.[25] Heat from the V-22's engines can potentially damage the flight decks of ships. Naval Air Systems Command devised a temporary fix of portable heat shields placed under the engines, and determined that a long-term solution would require redesigning decks with heat resistant coating, passive thermal barriers, and ship structure changes. Similar changes are required for F-35B operations.[89] In 2009, DARPA requested solutions for installing robust flight deck cooling.[90] Propulsion The V-22's two Rolls-Royce AE 1107C engines are connected by drive shafts to a common central gearbox so that one engine can power both proprotors if an engine failure occurs.[66] However, if a proprotor gearbox fails that proprotor cannot be feathered, and both engines must be stopped before an emergency landing.[65] The aircraft's autorotation characteristics are poor partly because the rotors have low inertia.[65] The V-22 has a maximum rotor downwash speed above 80 knots, more than the 64 knots lower limit of a hurricane.[91][92] The rotorwash usually prevents usage of the starboard door in hover, instead the rear ramp is used for rappelling and hoisting.[65][93] Boeing has stated the V-22 design loses 10 percent of its vertical lift over a tiltwing design when operating in helicopter mode because of airflow resistance due to the wings, but that the tiltrotor design has better short takeoff and landing performance.[94] In September 2013, Rolls-Royce announced it had increased the AE-1107C engine's power by 17 percent via the adoption of a new Block 3 turbine, an increase in fuel valve flow capacity, and accompanying software updates.
Views: 170372 ArmedForcesUpdate
SUPER POWERFUL Russian military off road 4WD Trucks
 
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Russian military unveils new off road four wheel drive trucks. A truck (United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, also[1] called a lorry in the United Kingdom and Ireland) is a motor vehicle designed to transport cargo. Trucks vary greatly in size, power, and configuration, with the smallest being mechanically similar to an automobile. Commercial trucks can be very large and powerful, and may be configured to mount specialized equipment, such as in the case of fire trucks and concrete mixers and suction excavators. Modern trucks are largely powered by diesel engines exclusively, although small to medium size trucks with gasoline engines exist in the US. In the European Union, vehicles with a gross combination mass of up to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) are known as light commercial vehicles, and those over as large goods vehicles. History[edit] The oldest truck was built in 1896 by Gottlieb Daimler.[2] The first truck in the United States was built by Autocar in 1899 and was available with optional 5 or 8 horsepower motors.[3] Terminology[edit] Etymology[edit] The word "truck" might come from a back-formation of "truckle" with the meaning "small wheel", "pulley", from Middle English trokell, in turn from Latin trochlea. Another explanation is that it comes from Latin trochus with the meaning of "iron hoop". In turn, both go back to Greek trokhos (τροχός) meaning "wheel" from trekhein (τρέχειν, "to run"). The first known usage of "truck" was in 1611 when it referred to the small strong wheels on ships' cannon carriages. In its extended usage it came to refer to carts for carrying heavy loads, a meaning known since 1771. With the meaning of "motor-powered load carrier", it has been in usage since 1930, shortened from "motor truck", which dates back to 1916.[4][5] "Lorry" has a more uncertain origin, but probably has its roots in the rail transport industry, where the word is known to have been used in 1838 to refer to a type of truck (a freight car as in British usage, not a bogie as in the American), specifically a large flat wagon. It probably derives from the verb lurry (to pull, tug) of uncertain origin. With the meaning of "self-propelled vehicle for carrying goods" it has been in usage since 1911.[6][7] Before that, the word "lorry" was used for a sort of big horse-drawn goods wagon. International variance In the United States, Canada, and the Philippines "truck" is usually reserved for commercial vehicles larger than normal cars, and includes pickups and other vehicles having an open load bed. In Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, the word "truck" is mostly reserved for larger vehicles; in Australia and New Zealand, a pickup truck is usually called a ute (short for "utility"), while in South Africa it is called a bakkie (Afrikaans: "small open container"). In the United Kingdom, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Ireland and Hong Kong lorry is used instead of truck, but only for the medium and heavy types. In American English, the word "truck" is often preceded by a word describing the type of vehicle, such as a "tanker truck". In British English these would be referred to as a "tanker" or "petrol tanker". In Australia and New Zealand, the term ute (short for coupé utility) is used to describe a pickup truck with an open cargo carrying space but a front similar to a passenger car, and which requires only a passenger car licence to drive. The concept was developed in 1933 by Lewis Bandt of the Ford Motor Company in Geelong following a request from a Gippsland farmer's wife for a vehicle that they could go to church in on Sunday without getting wet and also use to take the pigs to market on Monday.[9] Driving[edit] In many countries, driving a truck requires a special driving license. The requirements and limitations vary with each different jurisdiction. Australia[edit] In Australia, a truck driver's license is required for any motor vehicle with a Gross Vehicle Mass (GVM) exceeding 4,500 kilograms (9,921 lb). The motor vehicles classes are further expanded as: LR: Light rigid: a rigid vehicle with a GVM of more than 4,500 kilograms (9,921 lb) but not more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb) GVM. MR: Medium rigid: a rigid vehicle with 2 axles and a GVM of more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb) GVM. Also includes vehicles in class LR. HR: Heavy Rigid: a rigid vehicle with three or more axles and a GVM of more than 8,000 kilograms (17,637 lb)). Any towed trailer must not weigh more than 9,000 kilograms (19,842 lb)) GVM. Also includes articulated buses and vehicles in class MR. HC: Heavy Combination, a typical prime mover plus semi-trailer combination. MC: Multi Combination e.g., B Doubles/road trains.
Views: 9079146 ArmedForcesUpdate
NEW EXTRA DEADLY Ammunition for Police, Law Enforcement and Military
 
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A new extra deadly type of ammunition has been unveiled in the United States that could be good for police, law enforcement and military. A gun is a normally tubular weapon or other device designed to discharge projectiles or other material.[1] The projectile may be solid, liquid, gas or energy and may be free, as with bullets and artillery shells, or captive as with Taser probes and whaling harpoons. The means of projection varies according to design but is usually effected by the action of gas pressure, either produced through the rapid combustion of a propellant or compressed and stored by mechanical means, operating on the projectile inside an open-ended tube in the fashion of a piston. The confined gas accelerates the movable projectile down the length of the tube, imparting sufficient velocity to sustain the projectile's travel once the action of the gas ceases at the end of the tube or muzzle. Alternatively, acceleration via electromagnetic field generation may be employed in which case the tube may be dispensed with and a guide rail substituted. The first devices identified as guns appeared in China around CE 1000. By the 12th century the technology was spreading through the rest of Asia, and into Europe by the 13th century.[2] History The first device identified as a gun, a bamboo tube that used gunpowder to fire a spear, appeared in China around AD 1000.[2] The Chinese had previously invented gunpowder in the 9th century.[4][5][6] An early type of firearm (or portable gun) is the fire lance, a black-powder–filled tube attached to the end of a spear and used as a flamethrower; shrapnel was sometimes placed in the barrel so that it would fly out together with the flames.[6][7] The earliest depiction of a gunpowder weapon is the illustration of a fire-lance on a mid-10th century silk banner from Dunhuang.[8] The De'an Shoucheng Lu, an account of the siege of De'an in 1132, records that Song forces used fire-lances against the Jurchens.[9] In due course, the proportion of saltpeter in the propellant was increased to maximise its explosive power.[7] To better withstand that explosive power, the paper and bamboo of which fire-lance barrels were originally made came to be replaced by metal.[6] And to take full advantage of that power, the shrapnel came to be replaced by projectiles whose size and shape filled the barrel more closely.[7] With this, we have the three basic features of the gun: a barrel made of metal, high-nitrate gunpowder, and a projectile which totally occludes the muzzle so that the powder charge exerts its full potential in propellant effect.[10] One theory of how gunpowder came to Europe is that it made its way along the Silk Road through the Middle East; another is that it was brought to Europe during the Mongol invasion in the first half of the 13th century.[11][12] English Privy Wardrobe accounts list "ribaldis", a type of cannon, in the 1340s, and siege guns were used by the English at Calais in 1346.[13] The earliest surviving firearm in Europe has been found from Otepää, Estonia and it dates to at least 1396.[14] Around the late 14th century in Europe, smaller and portable hand-held cannons were developed, creating in effect the first smooth-bore personal firearm. In the late 15th century the Ottoman empire used firearms as part of its regular infantry. The first successful rapid-fire firearm is the Gatling Gun, invented by Richard Gatling and fielded by the Union forces during the American Civil War in the 1860s. The world's first sub-machine gun (a fully automatic firearm which fires pistol cartridges) able to be maneuvered by a single soldier is the MP18.1, invented by Theodor Bergmann. It was introduced into service in 1918 by the German Army during World War I as the primary weapon of the Stosstruppen (assault groups specialized in trench combat). The first assault rifle was introduced during World War II by the Germans, known as the StG44. It was the first firearm which bridges the gap between long range rifles, machine guns, and short range sub-machine guns. Since the mid-20th century guns that fire beams of energy rather than solid projectiles have been developed, and also guns that can be fired by means other than the use of gunpowder. Operating principle Most guns use compressed gas confined by the barrel to propel the bullet up to high speed, though devices operating in other ways are sometimes called guns. In firearms the high-pressure gas is generated by combustion, usually of gunpowder. This principle is similar to that of internal combustion engines, except that the bullet leaves the barrel, while the piston transfers its motion to other parts and returns down the cylinder. As in an internal combustion engine, the combustion propagates by deflagration rather than by detonation, and the optimal gunpowder, like the optimal motor fuel, is resistant to detonation. This is because much of the energy generated in detonation is in the form of a shock wave,
Views: 4031394 ArmedForcesUpdate
Malaysian Navy F-21 torpedo JUST AS GOOD as US Navy Mk 48 torpedo
 
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The french navy F-21 black shark torpedo is a great idea for the french navy and could be just as good as us navy Mk 48 torpedo. The Black Shark is a heavyweight torpedo developed by WASS of Italy. It is most closely associated with the Scorpène diesel-electric submarines produced by France for the export market, but is also found on some Type 209 submarines. Length 6.3 m (21 ft) Diameter 533 mm (21.0 in) Effective firing range 50 km (27 nmi) Warhead high explosive STANAG 4439 and MURAT-2 compliant Warhead weight Classified Detonation mechanism various Engine contra-rotating direct-drive brushless motor Propellant Al-AgO battery Speed 50 kt Launch platform Submarine Development[edit] Whitehead Alenia Sistemi Subacquei Italy, needed a more recent offering in the heavyweight torpedo market given that Atlas Elektronik, Germany had developed the DM2A4 Heavyweight Torpedo (export designation SeaHake mod4) for deployment on the new Type 212N Submarines of the German Navy. Furthermore the A184 system was an aging system that WASS considered as uncompetitive on the growing heavyweight torpedo export market, that of late has seen expansion with the sale of both the Scorpene and the U 209/210/212 submarines around the world, Greece, Portugal, Chile, Malaysia and India, being some of the latest.[2] The A184 system has long been deployed by the Italian Navy with the mod3 design remaining as its standard Heavyweight Torpedo.[3] While a capable system, WASS sought to attain advances in fibre optics and the continual improvement to electronics in developing the Black Shark thus creating a more competitive design in comparison to recent market entries.[3] The resulting work produced a heavyweight torpedo system with advanced ECCM abilities and an advanced sonar. The advancements in electric motor design and battery allowed an increase in both range and speed.[2] Features[edit] The Black Shark torpedo offers fibre optic wire for increased bandwidth and signal processing ability compared to copper wire guided torpedo types. The sonar capability include non-doppler shifted target discrimination and multi-frequency capability that features advanced spacial and angular analysis abilities.[4] The design goal for the torpedo was 300% improvement of passive acquisition and 200% active acquisition with its sonar system.[5] The brushless motor design coupled with the aluminum-silver oxide (Al-AgO) battery gives the system a top speed 50+ knot, and a range of 50 km, performance envelope.[2] Like all other battery powered HWTs, the battery power system does not suffer the loss of performance of Otto fuel II types at greater depths since there is no exhaust to deal with at greater pressures. The result is a 150% improvement in speed and 200% in torpedo endurance.[5] France F21 Development[edit] In 2008 France signed a development contract for 93 heavy torpedoes for its nuclear submarines, to be delivered from 2015.[6] The original plan called for a derivative of the Black Shark to be built by a joint venture between DCNS, Thales and WASS,[7] but they fell out and DCNS will now be developing the F21 Artemis with Thales and Atlas Elektronik.[6] The F21 shares similarities with the Black Shark, including an electric motor driven by an aluminium silver-oxide (AgO-Al) battery.[8] It will have a warhead of PBX B2211, range of 50 km (31 mi) and speed of 50 knots (93 km/h).[9] As of 2012 the project has a €485m budget with a unit cost of €2.3m (FY12), or €5.2m including development costs.[6] The F21 was first tested on DCNS's Pégase catamaran in February 2013 and a submarine launch is planned for 2014, with production deliveries scheduled to start in late 2015.[10] NSP/BSA - Nuovo Siluro Pesante / Black Shark Advanced[edit] Meanwhile, in Italy, WASS is developing NSP / BSA (Nuovo Siluro Pesante / Black Shark Advanced), new future torpedo for Marina Militare Italiana as result of government program A/R SMD 1/2010 [11] for development new BSA torpedos for Euro 87,5 Millions, within 2020: 12.02.2014 first test launch new NSP / BSA (Nuovo Siluro Pesante / Black Shark Advanced) by SSK Scirè [12] 19.06.2014 second test launch new NSP / BSA (Nuovo Siluro Pesante / Black Shark Advanced) by SSK Scirè [13] BSA will armed Marina Militare Italiana Todaro class submarines, with about 80 torpedos expected. Users[edit] Chilean Navy O'Higgins class (100 in 2003) [14] Thomson class Ecuadorian Navy Shiri class (16 in 2012 for Euro 24,6 millions) [15] Marina Militare Todaro class - I and II batch (under development BSA - Black Shark Advanced -; planned about 80 torpedos) Royal Malaysian Navy KD Tunku Abdul Rahman class (30 in 2003 for Euro 90 millions) [16][17][18] Portuguese Navy Tridente class (24 in 2005 for Euro 47 millions) [19][20][21] Republic of Singapore Navy Archer class [22][23] The modern torpedo is a self-propelled weapon with an explosive warhead, launched above or below the water surface,
Views: 96326 ArmedForcesUpdate